Graduate 3 130 7 3 58 48 130 Total 172 61

Graduate 3 130 7 3 58 48 130 total 172 61

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 16 pages.

Graduate degree 25 (14.5) 3 (13.0) 7 (11.5) 10 (16.1) 3 (5.8) 48 (13.0) Total 172 (100.0) 23 (100.0) 61 (100.0) 62 (100.0) 52 (100.0) 370 (100.0) Age (years) 18–24 17 (10.1) 4 (18.2) 9 (15.3) 3 (4.9) 2 (3.9) 35 (9.7) 25–31 22 (13.0) 3 (13.6) 8 (13.6) 7 (11.5) 6 (11.8) 46 (12.7) 32–38 27 (16.0) 4 (18.2) 11 (18.6) 5 (8.2) 11 (21.6) 58 (16.0) 39–45 20 (11.8) 4 (18.2) 9 (15.3) 14 (23.0) 7 (13.7) 54 (14.9) 46–52 33 (19.5) 5 (22.7) 12 (20.3) 16 (26.2) 12 (23.5) 78 (21.5) 53–59 35 (20.7) 1 (4.5) 7 (11.9) 7 (11.5) 8 (15.7) 58 (16.0) 60 15 (8.9) 1 (4.5) 3 (5.1) 9 (14.8) 5 (9.8) 33 (9.1) Total 169 (100.0) 22 (100.0) 59 (100.0) 61 (100.0) 51 (100.0) 362 (100.0) Occupation Professional 37 (21.5) 7 (31.8) 11 (18.6) 10 (16.1) 14 (26.9) 79 (21.5) Management 10 (5.8) 3 (13.6) 6 (10.2) 2 (3.2) 8 (15.4) 29 (7.9) Technical 12 (7.0) 2 (9.1) 2 (3.4) 4 (6.5) 4 (7.7) 24 (6.5) Retired 16 (9.3) 1 (4.5) 5 (8.5) 10 (16.1) 6 (11.5) 38 (10.4) Homemaker 17 (9.9) 2 (9.1) 7 (11.9) 11 (17.7) 3 (5.8) 40 (10.9) Not employed 11 (6.4) 1 (4.5) 4 (6.8) 3 (4.8) 3 (5.8) 22 (6.0) Student 9 (5.2) 3 (13.6) 2 (3.4) 2 (3.2) 2 (3.8) 18 (4.9) Administrative 23 (13.4) 2 (9.1) 5 (8.5) 5 (8.1) 4 (7.7) 39 (10.6) Self-employed 12 (7.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (5.1) 4 (6.5) 2 (3.8) 21 (5.7) Other 25 (14.5) 1 (4.5) 14 (23.7) 11 (17.7) 6 (11.5) 57 (15.5) Total 172 (100.0) 22 (100.0) 59 (100.0) 62 (100.0) 52 (100.0) 367 (100.0) Household income < $40 000 63 (38.7) 8 (38.1) 27 (46.6) 23 (41.1) 12 (25.0) 133 (38.4) $40,000–$59,999 34 (20.9) 6 (28.6) 13 (22.4) 13 (23.2) 12 (25.0) 78 (22.5) $60,000–$79 999 29 (17.8) 4 (19.0) 8 (13.8) 14 (25.0) 11 (22.9) 66 (19.1) $80,000–$99 999 15 (9.2) 3 (14.3) 3 (5.2) 3 (5.4) 4 (8.3) 28 (8.1) $100 000 22 (13.5) 0 (0.0) 7 (12.1) 3 (5.4) 9 (18.8) 41 (11.8) Total 163 (100.0) 21 (100.0) 58 (100.0) 56 (100.0) 48 (100.0) 346 (100.0) 3Cs, Confident Convenience-Oriented Comparison. % represents the percentage of respondents within the cluster.
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© 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd International Journal of Consumer Studies, 28 , 3, June 2004, pp268–283 277 L.N. McKinney Creating a satisfying internet shopping experience Hypothesis one was partially accepted. Consumers did exhibit different orientations toward internet shop- ping. However, the six orientations that were proposed did not cluster as intended. Convenience, confident, economic, browser/planner, store-preferred and opin- ion leadership were among the six orientations pro- posed. Consumers clustered into five different shopping orientation segments. Each of the six proposed orienta- tions was helpful in clustering the consumers; however, the resulting names of the clusters differed. Orientation segments were named the 3Cs Shoppers, the Store- Preferred Shoppers, the Highly Involved Shoppers, the Apathetic Shoppers, and the Apprehensive Shoppers. The convenience and confident orientations combined to form the 3Cs Shoppers and the Store-Preferred Shopper resulted as proposed. The economic, browser/ planner and opinion leadership orientations were not represented as separate shopping orientations; these orientations combined to form the characteristics of the resulting orientations. H2. Atmospheric variables used as a stimulus to attract internet consumers to shopping sites will vary for those with different orientations toward shopping An atmospheric variable contributed to site satisfaction for a shopping segment if it received the highest ‘Yes’ frequency count relative to ‘No’ and ‘Not applicable’ counts. Respondents were asked to indicate whether 36 atmospheric variables contributed to their satisfaction with the last internet site at which they made a purchase. Frequency results showed that regardless of shopping segment, a set of atmospheric variables contributed to satisfaction for all consumers (see Table 5). They were links to special offers/coupons, description of the prod- uct, graphic/photos/images, price(s) of merchandise, total cost of merchandise, option to delete a previously
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