That employee skills and knowledge are resources that

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that employee skills and knowledge are resources that the enterprise doesn’t own completely; if the employees leave the enterprise, they take their skills and knowledge with them. Unless an enterprise has developed a means of capturing some aspects of those resources (for example, through a knowledge management system) the enterprise retains none of the value. D3. Consider the tables in Exhibit 12-7. Describe the necessary procedures to construct a query to determine the number of hours for which Freda Matthews is scheduled to work during the first week of April, 2010. Join Employee to ParticipationLaborScheduleEmployee on the employee ID fields. Enter “LIKE Freda Matthews” as criteria in the employee table’s name field, include labor schedule ID, scheduled employee ID, and hours scheduled fields in query result. Join query result to the LaborSchedule table on the labor schedule ID fields. Enter BETWEEN 4/1/2010 and 4/7/2010 in End Date of LaborSchedule table. Sum the hours scheduled field. 162 Solutions Manual to accompany Dunn, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e
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The Human Resource Business Process D4. Consider the tables in Exhibit 12-5. Describe the necessary procedures to construct a query to determine the total number of labor hours needed for unfulfilled labor requisitions. Join LaborRequisition to LaborSchedule using a left outer join (with LaborRequisition as the left table) on the labor requisition ID fields. Enter “is null” as criteria in the labor schedule ID field. This query identifies the unfilled labor requisitions. Join the result to the Proposition Relationship table on the labor requisition ID fields and sum the hours needed field. Solutions Manual to accompany Dunn, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e 163
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Chapter 12 Applied Learning A1. Customers engage Kravenhall Katering to provide food and beverages at upscale parties. When notified about an upcoming party, one of Kravenhall’s supervisors must determine staffing needs. The supervisor records the number of hours required for each type of labor (e.g. cooking a ham, baking a cake, serving food, or bartending) on a staffing plan for the catering job. The supervisor also notes on the staffing plan whether the client has requested any specific employees for the catering job. The supervisor then creates a schedule for the catering job by calling the employees who have the skills needed for each type of labor and verifying their availability and willingness to participate in the catering job for a specified wage rate. The schedule lists each employee and the date and hours the employee will need to work on this job. When the catering job occurs, details of the hours worked by each employee are recorded on a timecard. The supervisor verifies the accuracy of each timecard and sends them to the payroll department. On the 15 th and last day of each month, a payroll clerk summarizes each employee’s timecards for catering jobs in the current pay period. The clerk calculates gross pay, withholdings, and net pay dollar amounts and enters the payment information into the database. The net pay amounts are transferred to the employees’ bank
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  • Spring '10
  • Baker
  • enterprise information systems, Supervisor Cash Supervisor Cash Payroll clerk External agents Employee Employee Employee Employee

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