Remanufacture a good by completely disassembling it

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Remanufacture a good by completely disassembling it and repairing or replacing worn-out or obsolete components and modules. Honda, for example. Cannibalize parts for use and repair of other equipment of the same kind, such as automobiles, locomotives, and airplanes. Recycle goods by disassembling them and selling the parts or scrap materials to other suppliers. Aluminum soda cans, for example. Incineration or landfill disposal of goods that are not economical to repair, refurbish, remanufacture, or recycle. Reverse logistics refers to managing the flow of finished goods, materials, or components that may be unusable or discarded through the supply chain from customers toward either suppliers, distributors, or manufacturers for the purpose of reuse, resale, or disposal. Reverse logistics: ACTIVITIES Logistics authorizing returns, receiving, sorting, testing, refurbishing, cannibalizing, repairing, remanufacturing, recycling, restocking, reshipping, and disposing of materials. Marketing/sales remarketing and selling the recovered good for reuse or resale to wholesalers and retailers. Accounting/fina nce approving warranty repairs, tracking reverse logistic revenue and costs, billing, and paying appropriate suppliers and third-party vendors. Call center service managing service center calls all along the supply chain to coordinate work activities such as collecting items from many diverse sources for recovery operations. Legal/regulatory compliance constantly monitoring compliance with local, state, federal, and country laws, import and e xport regulations including environmental, and service contract commitments. Supply chain integration the process of coordinating the physical flow of materials to ensure that the right parts are available at various stages of the supply chain,
such as manufacturing and assembly plants.
CHAPTER 15 Scheduling refers to the assignment of start and completion times to particular jobs, people, or equipment . Sequencing refers to determining the order in which jobs or tasks are processed . Flow time is the amount of time a job spends in the shop or factory . Makespan is the time needed to process a given set of jobs . Lateness is the difference between the completion time and the due date (either positive or negative) . Tardiness is the amount of time by which the completion time exceeds the due date . Dispatching is the process of selecting jobs for processing and authorizing the work to be done . Clarke–Wright Method . A simple technique that finds very good solutions for simple vehicle routing problems Three of the most popular sequencing rules for prioritizing jobs are: First come, first served (FCFS) Shortest processing time (SPT) Earliest due date (EDD) SPT rule tends to minimize average flow time and WIP inventory and maximize resource utilization.

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