4 if a sentence is not verifiable then it has no

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(4) If a sentence is not verifiable, then it has no meaning. (5) If a sentence is not verifiable, then realer is its denial. Therefore, (6) “God exists” is not empirically verifiable. Problem’s With the Objective 1: (1) The verifiability criterion of meaning has failed: nobody managed to specify the criterion successfully. (2) The theory is self-refuting. It claims that all assertions are either analytic (true in virtue of their meaning) or empirically verifiable. This the criterion itself must be either analytically true or empirically verifiable. But it is neither. Empirically verifiable – there is virtue in its meaning Objection 2: There is evidence that God does not exist – the problem of Evil Pascal’s Wager If we wager that God exists and he does then we gain eternal bliss; if he does not, we have lost nothing. If we wager that God does not exist and he does, then eternal misery is our share; if he does not, we gain only a lucky true belief. The obvious wager is to bet God exists. With such a bet we have everything to gain and nothing to lose. This is far superior to a bet where we have little to gain and everything to lose. Pascal’s Wager 1
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God exists God does not exist Wager for God Gain all Status quo Wager against God Misery Status quo Pascal’s Wager 2 God exists God does not exist Wager for God infinity f1 Wager against god f2 f3 Pages 100 – 109: Pascal’s Wager; Pascal argues that believing that God exists is a sensible wager, even if there is no evidence that God exists Prudential reason Evidential reason Wager provides us with a prudential reason for believing that God exists even if there is no evidence that there is a God Gamble if it can make sense to bet on improbably outcomes if the payoff is big enough Gamble , yes. Payoff if you win is so huge that cost to you if you lose is so small that it is a great gamble to make What is Pascal’s Argument? Believe in god or not believing in god = four outcomes Pascal says that payoff to you for believing in God is an infinite reward because you go to heaven and if you don’t believe in god there is an infinite punishment – eternal damnation If you believe in God and there is no God, you may have wasted time with religious rituals but not a horrible result If you don’t believe in God and there is no God, you receive a modest benefit because you can spend time in other activities Pascal aimed to provide a prudential reason, not an evidential reason Conclusion: With each possible outcome, you associate a utility that represents how good or bad the outcome is for you. What are the criticisms of Pascal’s argument? We can’t decide to believe a proposition; belief isn’t an action we control in this way Pascal says that you can choose to live your life in such a way that belief will come naturally after a while Specific assumptions about what God would be like if there was such a being Conclusion: Argument not very strong because we can’t assume God’s nature.
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