Adaptive life cycle a project life cycle also known

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Adaptive Life Cycle. A project life cycle, also known as change-driven or agile methods, that is intended to facilitate change and require a high degree of ongoing stakeholder involvement. Adaptive life cycles are also iterative and incremental, but differ in that iterations are very rapid (usually 2–4 weeks in length) and are fixed in time and resources. Additional Quality Planning Tools. A set of tools used to define the quality requirements and to plan effective quality management activities. They include, but are not limited to: brainstorming, force field analysis, nominal group techniques and quality management and control tools. Adjusting Leads and Lags. A technique used to find ways to bring project activities that are behind into alignment with plan during project execution. Advertising. The process of calling public attention to a project or effort.
528 ©2013 Project Management Institute. A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK ® Guide) – Fifth Edition GLOSSARY Affinity Diagram. A group creativity technique that allows large numbers of ideas to be classified into groups for review and analysis. Agreements. Any document or communication that defines the initial intentions of a project. This can take the form of a contract, memorandum of understanding (MOU), letters of agreement, verbal agreements, email, etc. Alternative Analysis. A technique used to evaluate identified options in order to select which options or approaches to use to execute and perform the work of the project. Alternatives Generation. A technique used to develop as many potential options as possible in order to identify different approaches to execute and perform the work of the project. Analogous Estimating. A technique for estimating the duration or cost of an activity or a project using historical data from a similar activity or project. Analytical Techniques. Various techniques used to evaluate, analyze, or forecast potential outcomes based on possible variations of project or environmental variables and their relationships with other variables. Application Area. A category of projects that have common components significant in such projects, but are not needed or present in all projects. Application areas are usually defined in terms of either the product (i.e., by similar technologies or production methods) or the type of customer (i.e., internal versus external, government versus commercial) or industry sector (i.e., utilities, automotive, aerospace, information technologies, etc.). Application areas can overlap. Applying Leads and Lags. A technique that is used to adjust the amount of time between predecessor and successor activities. Apportioned Effort. An activity where effort is allotted proportionately across certain discrete efforts and not divisible into discrete efforts. [Note: Apportioned effort is one of three earned value management (EVM) types of activities used to measure work performance.] Approved Change Request. A change request that has been processed through the integrated change control process and approved.

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