The observations show that when soap solution was

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The observations show that when soap solution was used, a precipitate always formed with the addition of either calcium chloride or magnesium chloride. When detergent solution was used, no changes were observed with the addition of calcium chloride or magnesium chloride. But when sodium carbonate was added to soap or detergent, a precipitate always formed. Test 3: The effect of oils on water, soap and detergent were tested using canola oil. In the first test tube, 2.5 mL of water was added to 2 drops of canola oil. The result was a thick, bubbly substance with a gel-like consistency. This could be because oils generally have more sites of unsaturation and if oils are partially hydrogenated with hydrogen, a semisolid is formed. Obviously with the addition of water, the oil becomes hydrogenated and the gel substance is obtained. In the second test tube, 2.5 mL of detergent solution was added to 2 drops of canola oil. The result was a cloudy, soapy substance with a watery consistency. This could be because canola oil was used which contains no oleic acid. In the third test tube, 2.5 mL of soap solution was added to 2 drops of canola oil. The result was a clearish-blue color, bubbly, but with a gel-like consistency. Test 4: The effect of dilute acid on soap and detergent. Starting out with the soap solution, 10 drops of sulfuric acid was added to 15 mL of remaining soap solution, the soap became acidic as well as cloudier. When using the detergent solution, 25 drops of sulfuric acid was added to make the solution acidic. However the appearance of the solution did not change. From these observations, soap is easier to become acidic than detergent is. This might have something to do with the effects of hard water on soap versus detergent.

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