Dispossessed seeking refuge in canada or for that

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“dispossessed” seeking refuge in Canada; or, for that matter, how it is that she has been chosen to speak on behalf of Canadians on this topic We were also told during this concert that Canada is the country that attends to the world's urgent needs, and, on occasion, even cleans up the messes left by the United States Meharchand: “In famine, and floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes, disasters made by misfortunes and by man, Canadians have always been there … It's a Canadian tradition of helping and caring that reaches out across time and around the world. Canadians in small towns and big cities respond when they see communities in need, no matter where that need is. [Footage of people donating food and clothing] That spirit of giving is part of what makes us Canadians” The identification of Canada with “peacekeeping” missions and humanitarian aid is not “timeless,” but has its beginning point in 1956, when the term “peacekeeper” came into use Furthermore, while humanitarian aid and peacekeeping is in principle admirable—there is, certainly, much to be admired in the ways in which Canadians have engaged in these kinds of activities—it also, as Peter Hodgins has pointed out, does significant ideological work One gets a sense of the kind of ideological work it does by consulting Canada's official foreign policy document. There, the goals of international assistance are to “connec[t] the Canadian economy to some of the world's fastest growing markets—the markets of the developing world. And, in the long - run, development cooperation can help lift developing countries out of poverty. This means that it contributes to a stronger global economy in which Canadians, and other peoples, can grow and prosper. International Assistance also contributes to global security by tackling many key threats to human security, such as the abuse of human rights, disease, environmental degradation, population growth and the widening gap between rich and poor. Finally, it is one of the clearest international expressions of Canadian values and culture—of Canadians' desire
to help the less fortunate and of their strong sense of social justice—and an effective means of sharing these values with the rest of the world.” Through these acts Canadians “share” their values with others “less fortunate,” perhaps indicating that these less fortunate do not hold these values already The document, which perhaps reflects in part the general public's feelings about the benefits of international aid, has something of the “white man's burden” of colonial discourse about it; again, as Peter Hodgins points out, a cynic might view this “combination of economic and ‘civilizing’ motives for humanitarian aid as dangerously close to the arguments that justified the nineteenth - century colonialism.” Sherene Razack describes modern peacekeeping as a color line with civilized white nations on one side and uncivilized Third World nations on the other (10). In these remote nations where evil breeds—“the axis of evil”—we send our unsuspecting troops.

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