Demilles ten commandments with its cast of thousands

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spectacles such as Cecil B. DeMille's Ten Commandments with its "cast of thousands" and dazzling special  effects. Comedies, such as the slapstick masterpieces starring Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton enjoyed  great popularity as well.  Like radio, movies created a new popular culture, with common speech, dress, behavior, and heroes. And  like radio, Hollywood did its share to reinforce racial stereotypes by denigrating minority groups. The radio,  the electric phonograph, and the silver screen both molded and mirrored mass culture.  Spectator sports attracted vast audiences in the 1920s. The country yearned for heroes in an increasingly  impersonal, bureaucratic society, and sports provided them. Prize fighters like Jack Dempsey became  national idols. Teams sports flourished, but Americans focused on individuals superstars, people whose  talents or personalities made them appear larger than life. Knute Rockne and his "Four Horsemen" at Notre  Dame spurred interest in college football. Professional football began during the 1920s. In 1925, Harold  "Red" Grange, the "Galloping Ghost" halfback for the University of Illinois, attracted 68,000 fans to a  professional football game at Brooklyn's Polo Grounds.  Baseball drew even bigger crowds than football. The decade began with the sport mired in scandal. In 1920, three members of the Chicago White Sox told a grand jury that they and five other players had thrown the 1919 World Series. As a result of the "Black Sox" scandal, eight players were banished from the sport. But baseball soon regained its popularity, thanks to George Herman ("Babe") Ruth, the sport's undisputed superstar. Up until the 1920s Ty Cobb's defensive brand of baseball, with its emphasis on base hits and stolen bases, had dominated the sport. Ruth transformed baseball into the game of the
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home-run hitter. In 1921, the New York Yankee slugger hit 59 home runs--more than any other team. In 1927, the "Sultan of Swat" hit 60. from:
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