The contention of the appellants is that the agreement was an outright sale of

The contention of the appellants is that the

This preview shows page 11 - 12 out of 18 pages.

The contention of the appellants is that the agreement was an outright sale of the property with the option for Tara to repurchase within a year from the date of the execution of the agreement, that is, March 30, 1974. On the other hand, the respondent contended that the agreement was a security agreement whereby the 1983 2 MLJ 196 at204 property would be transferred to Suppiah on payment of the two sums mentioned earlier subject to the two undertakings given by Suppiah in the form of a manuscript. The two undertakings were (i) that Suppiah would not sell the property to anyone for one year without the consent of Tara; and (ii) that he would transfer the property back to Tara on her repaying the $220,000.00 within one year. It is the submission of the respondent that the one year period is to be calculated from the time Suppiah paid the two sums and became the registered proprietor and not as contended by the appellants from March 30, 1974. Several factors favour the contention of the respondent. The insertion of the manuscript was a clear indication that it was meant to be a security agreement rather than an outright sale. It is not unlike the Malay customary transaction known as jual janji. In such a transaction the borrower transfers his land to the lender on payment who takes possession of the land and may make any profit out of the land as a sort of interest payment. The borrower is entitled to have the land transferred back to him on paying the debt. However, when a period for repayment of the loan is fixed then the default to pay will convert the original arrangement into an absolute sale, jual putus. The learned Judge had no doubt at all that the appellants knew that Tara and Devan intended the agreement to be a security agreement by reason of the manuscript. He also pointed out that Tara had an earlier experience of such transfer and re-transfer of the property. Devan transferred the property to one H.L. Tan for $10,200.00. Later, H.L. Tan transferred it back to Tara for $10,700.00. The extra was meant to be for interest. Tara was therefore familiar with such type of transaction. Also, nowhere in the agreement was any mention made of selling and purchasing. Neither was purchaser or vendor used to suggest an outright sale. Further, if it was meant to be an outright sale the usual practice of payment within a reasonable time, say within a week, must be followed. Suppiah conceded as much when cross-examined that such was the practice in an outright sale. Further, the correspondence referred to earlier between Suppiah & Singh and the CKB do not seem to support an outright sale. In P.33 (Volume 8 page 179)
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture