ASSESSMENT Priority Diagnosis Cherry Angioma Differential Diagnoses 1 Drug

Assessment priority diagnosis cherry angioma

This preview shows page 4 - 5 out of 5 pages.

ASSESSMENT: Priority Diagnosis: Cherry Angioma Differential Diagnoses: 1 Drug eruption 2 Pityriasis Rosea 3 Thrombocytopenic purpura The primary diagnosis selected in this patient is cherry angioma, as the clinical presentation and history best supports this diagnosis. The patient presented with a non-painful, non-pruritic
Image of page 4
papular rash limited to the trunk of the body with no other negative symptoms. A drug eruption could be responsible for a red rash on the patient’s trunk, but the patient denies any use of new medications and the rash is not generalized, pink, and morbilliform, how drug rashes usually are presented (Ball et al., 2015). Pityriasis Rosea meets some of the criteria, but the rash is not itchy, scaly, or in oval patches, and the patient denies any recent illnesses (Dains, Baumann, & Scheibel, 2016). Thrombocytopenic purpura is a contender for a priority diagnosis since the patient is on blood thinners and at risk for increased bleeding, but lab results show that platelet and other blood counts are within normal limits, and the rash is not generalized (Ball et al., 2015). References Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2015). Seidel's guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Dains, J. E., Baumann, L. C., & Scheibel, P. (2016). Advanced health assessment and clinical diagnosis in primary care (5th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Ely, J. W., & Stone, M. S. (2010). The generalized rash: Part I. Differential diagnosis. American Family Physician , 81(6), 726-734. Retrieved from
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 5 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture