When the system boundaries are defined the scope of

This preview shows page 36 - 40 out of 182 pages.

When the system boundaries are defined, the scope of the system is deter- mined. The scope comprises those aspects that can be changed and designed during system development. At the same time, it is also defined which aspects belong to the environment and thus cannot be altered during development and may provide constraints for the system to be developed.
Image of page 36

Subscribe to view the full document.

18 2 System and Context Boundaries The context boundary separates the part of the environment that influences the requirements for the system to be developed from that part that does not influence the requirements. Typical aspects within the sys- tem context are stakeholders (e.g., the users of the system) and documents (e.g., standards that have to be considered) as well as other systems that, for instance, interact with the system to be developed. Defining the system and context boundaries successfully is the foundation for a systematic elicitation of requirements for the system to be developed.
Image of page 37
19 3 Eliciting Requirements A core activity of requirements engineering is the elicitation of require- ments for the system to be developed. The basis for requirements elicita- tion is the knowledge that has been gained during requirements engineer- ing about the system context of the system to be developed, which comprises the requirements sources that are to be analyzed and queried. 3.1 Requirements Sources Three types of requirements sources There are three different kinds of requirements sources: Stakeholders (see section 1.1.2 ) are people or organizations that (directly or indirectly) influence the requirements of a system. Exam- ples of stakeholders are users of the system, operators of the system, developers, architects, customers, and testers. Documents often contain important information that can provide requirements. Examples of documents are universal documents, such as standards and legal documents, as well as domain- or organization- specific documents, such as requirements documents and error reports of legacy systems. Systems in operation can be legacy or predecessor systems as well as competing systems. By giving the stakeholders a chance to try the sys- tem out, they can gain an impression of the current system and can request extensions or changes based on their impressions. 3.1.1 Stakeholders and Their Significance Significance of stakeholders Identifying the relevant stakeholders is a central task of requirements engineering [Glinz and Wieringa 2007] . For the requirements engineer, stakeholders are important sources of requirements for the system (see section 1.1.2 ). It is the task of the requirements engineer to gather,
Image of page 38

Subscribe to view the full document.

20 3 Eliciting Requirements document, and consolidate the partially conflicting goals and require- ments of different stakeholders [Potts et al. 1994] (see chapter 8 ).
Image of page 39
Image of page 40

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes