might translate at some level into knowledge of how to successfully exhort

Might translate at some level into knowledge of how

This preview shows page 7 - 8 out of 53 pages.

might translate at some level into knowledge of how to successfully exhort people to live, understand, and progress socially in increasingly humane ways. Link – Security Terrorism is grounded in a policy of security and promotes American exceptionalism resulting in a need to eradicate those who are deemed lesser Ivie 7  ( Robert, Prof of Comm and Culture @ Indiana U, Rhetoric & Public Affairs. V. 10. Is. 2., 2007, 221+, Questia) JPG The stubborn question of security, which always confounds and often preempts or subsumes and subordinates any immediate aspiration of peace, is itself provoked by a rhetoric of evil , which envelops all considerations of safety and well- being in a swirl of fear and hatred . The ubiquitous sign of evil converts the secular quest for security into a prayer for redemption and a sacrament of atonement through the sacrifice of "a scapegoat in whom we have invested all the evil in the world."3 Safety becomes a matter of salvation in the rhetorical universe that is war culture . No other equation casts such a deadly spell on an embattled people confronted by a deeply troubled world than the "myth of redemptive violence ."4 An unambiguous , Manichean distinction between good and evil, which Elisabeth Anker identifies as a "pervasive cultural code" expressed in melodramatic narrations of villainous victimization and heroic redemption, structures American political discourse and news coverage alike, diminishing public debate and conflating the exercise of state power with national identity.5 America's lethal preoccupation with evil precedes the tragedy of 9/11 and George W. Bush as presidential spokesman-in-chief. Certainly Ronald Reagan was eager to proclaim the Soviet Union an evil empire, and the dark memory of Adolf Hitler is forever fixed in the national imaginary as the personification of archetypal evil. The image of evildoers evoked by President Bush after the fall of Manhattan's twin towers resonated not only with right-wing Christian fundamentalism but also with mainstream political culture rooted in the secular religion of national mission and American exceptionalism. The living legacy of exceptionalism , as Seymour Martin Lipset observes, is a moralistic creed that insists Americans are opposed to evil in their foreign relations and "on God's side against Satan" in matters of warfare .6 The United States is the one essential nation above all others, the beacon and exemplar of standards that no other country can match. Exceptionalism is a founding myth and, Michael Hirsh notes , the "wellspring" of the current war against terrorism insofar as such a war stands for remaking the world in America's image .7 A deep and wide channel of patriotic piety has been cut over centuries of spilling blood in the name of the Almighty and the Redeemer. As a matter of history and of living custom, a Manichean divide between good and evil has come to separate righteous patriots from enemies of the state. Thus Bush's belabored and hardly deft, but certainly compelling,
Image of page 7
Image of page 8

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture