The Partnership for Prescription Assistance connects qualified low income

The partnership for prescription assistance connects

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The Partnership for Prescription Assistance connects qualified, low-income people with discount prescription drugs, direct from the pharmaceutical manufacture. Since the start of the NJ Asthma Awareness and Education Program (AAEP) there has been increase compliance with patients living with asthma. In my area, suburban New Jersey there is many places to receive care. There are several free clinics through neighboring hospitals, and several emergent walk- in clinics the patient could choose to visit. MD offices are plentiful in my surrounding area. I believe the problem in my area is one of compliance. The patient will go to the MD office or clinic when they are feeling sick or their asthma is not under control, but will not follow up and continue to take the medication prescribed. They won’t do the maintenance part of the disease, and will seek treatment only when their asthma is not controlled. The cost of the medication for some is a big issue. There are programs for people to get their medication if they don’t have insurance, but maybe there is no social worker to tell them about it. I believe a social worker or navigator in primary care offices or walk in clinics could help bridge the gap in education for these patients. The patients would be counseled on their options and what programs they can apply for to receive help without going to a hospital. A2b. Clinical Guidelines In 2007, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) released its third set of guidelines for asthma care. The focus of these guidelines was asthma severity and asthma control. Asthma care requires assessment and planning, education, control of triggers contributing to asthma severity, and pharmacology treatment (2007). 7
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PATHOPHARMACOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR ADVANCED Assessment The assessment of asthma is measured against how bad is the asthma? Is it under control? How does the patient respond to treatment? The assessment of asthma is how bad the symptoms are, and how they are minimized, and how the patient responds to their therapy. When a patient is seen for the first time the severity of their asthma is assessed, and clinical decisions are made on how to treat the patient. Whether or not to give a long term control medication to a patient. After therapy is started, whether the asthma is controlled or not will help decide whether to continue or change the therapy. The level of severity is directly related to the lowest level of treatment required to maintain control (2007). Standardized questionnaires like the Asthma Control Test, and the Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire are helpful in assessing patients. Diagnosis The diagnosis of asthma requires a detailed medical history, a physical exam, and spirometer testing to be done. Situations like a patient in daycare, inhaled allergens, or irritants, frequent respiratory infections are all taken into consideration when creating a treatment plan of asthma. Is the patient wheezing, coughing, having difficulty breathing, have chest tightness, exposed to chemicals, pets, irritants, mold, do they exercise? Does
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