Chamber flights for civilian pilots and crewmembers

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Sensation and Perception
Brockmole/Goldstein
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chamber flights for civilian pilots and crewmembers in 1962 and provides this opportunity through aviation physiology training conducted at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) and at many military facilities across the United States. A typical altitude chamber profile used by CAMI is shown in figure B. HYPOXIC HYPOXIA Although the percentage of oxygen in the atmosphere is constant, its partial pressure decreases proportionately as atmospheric pressure decreases. As you ascend during flight, the percentage of each gas in the atmosphere remains the same but there are fewer molecules available at the pressure required for them to pass between the membranes in your respiratory system. This decrease of oxygen molecules at sufficient pressure can lead to hypoxic hypoxia. Hypoxic hypoxia is considered to be the most lethal factor of all physiological causes of accidents. It can occur very suddenly at high altitudes during rapid decompression, or it can occur slowly at lower altitudes when you are exposed to insufficient oxygen over an extended period of time. The time of useful consciousness is the maximum time you have to make a rational, life-saving decision and carry it out following a lack of oxygen at a given altitude. You may also hear this time referred to as effective performance time. If you go beyond this time, you may not be able to place an oxygen mask over your face, even if you try. [Figure 10-16] 10-14 The chamber ascends at 3,000 feet per minute to 25,000 feet. You remove your oxygen mask for a maximum of 5 minutes to experience the symptoms of hypoxia. The chamber descends to ground level at 3,000 feet per minute. An ear and sinus check is performed as the chamber ascends at 3,000 feet per minute to a simulated altitude of 6,000 feet and then descends to 2,000 feet. The chamber ascends to 8,000 feet and then you experience a rapid decompression as the chamber ascends to 18,000 feet in 8 to 10 seconds. The preflight briefing and oxygen equipment lab familiarizes you with the flight profile and correct procedures for using the oxygen mask and regulator. Official U.S. Air Force Photo Carter P. Luna Physiology Training Center at Peterson Air Force Base Simulated Altitude (ft MSL)
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Chapter 2 / Exercise 1
Sensation and Perception
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A V I A T I O N P H Y S I O L O G Y S E C T I O N A Figure 10-16. Recovery from hypoxia usually occurs rapidly after a person has been given oxygen. However, if you have suffered severe hypoxia, your mental and physical performance may be reduced for several hours. HYPEMIC HYPOXIA When your blood is not able to carry a sufficient amount of oxygen to the cells in your body, a condition called hypemic hypoxia occurs. This type of hypoxia is a result of a deficiency in the blood, rather than a lack of inhaled oxygen and can be caused by a variety of factors. For example, if you have anemia, or a reduced number of healthy functioning blood cells for any reason (disease, blood loss, deformed blood cells, etc.), your blood has a decreased capacity for carrying oxygen. In addition, any factor which

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