were willing to sacrifice someone who is important to them whether it is

Were willing to sacrifice someone who is important to

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were willing to sacrifice someone who is important to them -- whether it is someone crucial to the force or someone dear to their hearts. One could say that the Jews in the ghetto indirectly killed Wittenberg as they did not wish to risk their lives to ‘save’ one person. hundreds of lives is definitely more important than one life. under normal circumstance, average people do not take any life lightly. But under the extreme situation mentioned in the testimony, they did not know if the SS would truly destroy the whole ghetto if they didn’t turn in Witterberg. Moral standard did not apply here. life of witterberg became disposable. This is the choiceless choice the Jews in the ghetto faced. Should they know they are all going to ended up being deported to concentration camp, they might be more incline to resisting the SS by not turning in Wittenberg, to make a statement that they are going to resis. Yet they did not know their already planned out faith so they sacrificed Wittenberg in order to save their lives. Landau, Appel & Kaplan The choiceless choice that Landau and Appel faced was mainly about their identities. Based on the Landau and Appel Memoirs, it would seem that Nazi policy affected the Jew’s identity as Germans in that many Jews found themselves in a sudden identity crisis in which they were no longer considered to be citizens with rights in Germany but inwardly felt that they still belonged to that “ German thinking” that was the crux of enlightenment ideals which had espoused freedom and equality. While they were born into Jewish, both Landau & Appel identify with German and they were raised with ‘German virtues’. The policies targeting Jews continued to unfold, they were put to a position which they can no longer consider themselves as German. Although the German Jews still had incredible nationalism and support for their country, they were exiled by the rest of society for their religion. By 1933, Hitler had spoke for the first time denouncing Jews as a people and proclaiming them as a distrusting and destructing race. In the beginning, there were people who supported the Jewish people. But as time passed, those people started to disappear. Anyone who came out in support of the Jews was blacklisted in German society. A well known phrase became known in Germany as "death to the Jews." It had become unsafe for Jewish children to attend school as teachers brought up "the Jewish question," which denounced "all jews, without exception, as scoundrels and as the most destructive force in every country they were living." It was a complex contradiction that left many divided, especially on gender lines. After reading Kaplan’s piece in conjunction with the Memoirs, it seemed fairly evident that men to a large extent struggled to disassociate themselves with being “German” due to various reasons such as political ties, previous military duties, and a strong connection to their state. On the contrary,
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