Also importantly a hong kong study of urban working

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(Courtemanche). Also importantly, a Hong Kong study of urban working women found that women who worked longer hours were significantly more likely to have obese children than women who worked shorter hours - which also relates greatly to socioeconomic status, as in lower and middle class families, it is often necessary for both parents to work (Kim). This combination of increased work hours, which has a clear and significant impact on socioeconomic status, and therefore obesity/BMI. Those having a low-income and also those that are in the minority population are not the only ones being affected by obesity. It has been found that disparities in obesity and also obesity- related conditions are evident by geographic location (Hill et. al, par 1). It is known that obesity has been an epidemic in the United States and other parts of the world. Many throw out factors describing why obesity is such a problem, especially in the United States. There are also people
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Emerson, Jones, McArthur, Robards, Siddiqui, 6 giving ideas for solutions to this growing issue that is also not being talked about and acknowledged as much as it should be. Therefore, a geographic location is a rational place to start when looking at obesity rates and comparisons. According to the BMC Public Health, the southern states in the United States contain higher burdens of obesity than the northern states. It was also noted that rural areas suffer from obesity and obesity-related conditions far more than urban areas (par 5). When compared to urban and suburban counterparts, rural areas contain higher rates of morbidity and mortality from chronic health condition. Those living in a rural population are more likely to be obese which will then lead to health issues like Type 2 Diabetes. The BMC Public Health also states, From social determinants of health framework, increased prevalence of obesity in rural populations stems in part, from ‘downstream’ behavioral factors such as physical inactivity and poor diet among rural populations. However, these behavioral patterns are influenced by ‘upstream’ determinants such as lower educational attainment and lower SES also characterizing many rural areas” (par 5). Due to these people living in a rural area, they may have limited access to the facilities and amenities that foster healthy living behaviors. They may not have access to grocery stores, health facilities or recreation centers. Some of this lack of access is caused by the fact that rural areas have a lot of land and a sparse amount of people that tend to live spread out. Rural communities also have limited access to these facilities because of a low socioeconomic status. If individuals are unable to buy groceries from a grocery store, they would be limited to the types of food that they were able to purchase. Small convenience stores would not have the capacity to hold large
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Emerson, Jones, McArthur, Robards, Siddiqui, 7 amounts and differing foods. They would primarily contain snacks and foods that could be considered unhealthy. After consuming these unhealthy and non-nutritional foods for long
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