Obviously the faster you jog or the harder you

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Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 04
Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
Nevid
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Obviously the faster you jog or the harder you exercise the higher your Met level requirement. Most moderate-intensity activates such as easy walking require about 4-6 Mets. But intense activities like cross-country skiing, might require as much as 10-16 Mets. On the other hand, low intensity activities, (for example -taking a shower or brushing your teeth), might only requires about 2-3 Mets. You can also take a treadmill fitness test to get an estimate of met expenditure based on your age, weight, heart rate and the pace at which you walk or run. So what does all of this mean for you? Recent research shows that if you have a Met potential of 5 or below (That is your energy requirement seldom surpasses the 5 Met level). You’re probably in poor physical health and at a greater risk for premature death. On the other hand, if your Met potential is 8 or above, most likely you are in good health and research shows you have a four fold increase in potential longevity as compared to the 5 or below met potential person mentioned previously. In other words, if you’re a 5 met potential or lower person you have a 4 x greater chance of dying a premature death than the 8 met potential person. Quite a big difference. To transform yourself from a 5 met to 8 or greater met potential person is what your personal fitness program is all about. In simple terms, it can be done with perseverance and patience. It won’t happen all at once, but with time and hard work, you’ll see yourself make that gradual transformation. Its referred to as the law of use . You’ve probably heard it before, “use it or loses it”. 79
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Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 04
Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
Nevid
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Our bodies give us a perfect illustration of how this “use it or lose it” principle works. You can use any exercise or body part as an example, but, for simplicity sake let’s just use the common push up. Let’s say you can’t even do one good regular push-up. But maybe you can do one modified push up from the knee position. Well that’s a start. So you take what little strength you have and you put it to work. If you just do one push-up a day for a week or two, before long you’ll find out it’s really not that hard , and maybe you can even do one or two regular push-ups. Then you move up to 2 push ups and you do that each day for another couple of weeks. Pretty soon they’ll get easier and then you move to 3 and so on. Before long you’ll be doing 10, then 20, then 30 and more. You’ll look back and realize you accomplished something that would have been very difficult just a few months earlier. Now, you could also very easily do just the opposite. You could take what you have and refuse to use it and ultimately lose it. For instance, let’s use an extreme example. Say you tied your hand and arm to your side in such a way that you were unable to move it. If you left it that way for 4 or 5 months the muscle would atrophy and your arm that was once healthy and had unlimited

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