V developing a sociological imagination through

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A History of Modern Psychology
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 17
A History of Modern Psychology
Schultz/Schultz
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V.Developing a Sociological Imagination• Through globalization—the worldwide integration of government policies, cultures, social movements, and financial markets through trade and the exchange of ideas—our lives are more connected with and interdependent upon diverse groups of people around the world whose beliefs and practices may be quite different from our own.• There is a growing awareness that current social problems can only be addressed by recognizing the full scope of our economic, political, and social interdependence. Through theory and research, sociologists offer us the tools we need.KEY TERMSAgencyThe freedom individuals have to choose and to act.AnomieThe loss of direction felt in a society when social control of individual behavior hasbecome ineffective.Applied sociologyThe use of the discipline of sociology with the specific intent of yieldingpractical applications for human behavior and organizations.Clinical sociologyThe use of the discipline of sociology with the specific intent of alteringorganizations or restructuring social institutions. Conflict perspectiveA sociological approach that assumes that social behavior is bestunderstood in terms of tension between groups over power or the allocation of resources,including housing, money, access to services, and political representation. Functionalist perspectiveA sociological approach that emphasizes the way in which the partsof a society are structured to maintain its stability. GlobalizationThe worldwide integration of government policies, cultures, social movements,and financial markets through trade and the exchange of ideas.
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A History of Modern Psychology
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 17
A History of Modern Psychology
Schultz/Schultz
Expert Verified
Interactionist perspectiveA sociological approach that generalizes about everyday forms ofsocial interaction in order to explain society as a whole. MacrosociologySociological investigation that concentrates on large-scale phenomena or entirecivilizations. MicrosociologySociological investigation that stresses the study of small groups and theanalysis of our everyday experiences and interactions. Natural scienceThe study of the physical features of nature and the ways in which they interactand change. Private troublesObstacles that individuals face as individuals rather than as a consequence of their social position.Public issuesObstacles that individuals in similar positions face; also referred to by sociologistsas “social problems.”ScienceThe body of knowledge obtained by methods based on systematic observation. Social inequalityA condition in which members of society have differing amounts of wealth,prestige, or power. Social scienceThe study of the social features of humans and the ways in which they interactand change. Sociological imaginationAn awareness of the relationship between who we are as individualsand the social forces that shape our lives. SociologyThe systematic study of the relationship between the individual and society and of theconsequences of difference. TheoryIn sociology a set of statements that seeks to explain problems, actions, or behavior.

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