Well all of the opposite of the works well points

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Well, all of the opposite of the “works well” points, plus: No word fillers um, like, yeah, No connection with audience Nervous habits, twitch, tics Fluency in the language of presentation Don’t read notes Improperly dressed Inconsistency with tempo (fast/slow) WALL OF TEXT slides Forgetting (points, train of thought, slide content) Offensive, profanity, vulgar Right vocabulary (don’t talk down) Group Brainstorm
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What does not work well? Annoying, hard to read text Monotone speaking Cell phone Bad posture Lack of body language Reading your slides Ask rhetorical questions Not knowing what comes next Off topic, tangents Not able to answer questions (simple), not clear, w/o examples Don’t clarify Q’s Don’t encourage hibernation! (7am, lights out) Group Brainstorm
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Personal speaker pet peeves? Personal tics (repetitive actions like twirling hair) Turn back to audience Um, ah, you know, like, … filler words Unequal effort by team members Constant interruption by audience or team members Chewing gum Yawning Slide surprises “oh, I didn’t know I was supposed to cover that, okay…” Group Brainstorm
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Personal speaker pet peeves? On phone, Distracted Obnoxiously chewing gum Stiff as board Bite nails Busy hands Hair flip Move around too much Monotony Repetitiveness Group Brainstorm
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Personal speaker pet peeves? Uh, um, ah, kinda, like, sorta, you know You can’t usually hear yourself do this, have someone else listen and coach Don’t speak loud enough Project, but don’t yell. Always make sure that the most distant person can hear you Text heavy slides What’s the point of a presentation if you just project your whole report? People will read (or sleep) and not listen. Reading from a paper (or slides) Don’t disrespect your audience by losing a connection. (NOTE: humanities difference) Group Brainstorm
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Personal speaker pet peeves? No desperate open ended questions Only Q’s audience can and will answer Obscure jokes Bad metaphors Alienate audience folk who don’t get it. Forced, artificial behaviors (“smile check!”) Annoying, esp. if repeated. Hands in pocket Keep your hands and arms in a natural, relaxed position. Be expressive as need, but don’t overdo it. Group Brainstorm
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  • Fall '08
  • Koru,G
  • representative, Group Brainstorm, speaker pet peeves

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