Public Speaking Reading Notes

Listening before your speech and write accordingly

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listening before your speech and write accordingly, consider your listeners’ attention and energy levels, assess your audience’s knowledge and abilities and go in depth in your topic accordingly instead of boring them or confusing them, front and black-load your main message, use presentation aids strategically, encourage active listening, tailor your delivery to audience, watch out for argumentative listeners, and watch out for defeated listeners (confused listeners who just gave up on listening), and superficial listeners (listening on the outside, distracted on the inside) When listening in the audience, you must be able to provide informed speech critique - take notes, identify main points, consider the speech’s objective, support feedback with examples, be ethical Chapter 5: A speech that is well-tailored to its audience allows its listeners to become much more interested in and attentive to the speech Second, listeners experience positive feelings towards the speaker and the speech if they understand it Third, listeners open their minds to the speech message if it targets their persona or interests Situational characteristics are factors of a speech setting that can be observed before a speech Size (audience size), presentation time (body clock, chronemics, refers to when the speech is given), location (forum), mobility (stationary audience or mobile audience), Incorporating demographics: Age, gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic background, political affiliation Avoid gender stereotypes and sexist language, acknowledge sexual orientation, anything that would be offensive to your audience based on overall demographic Seek common ground in order to deliver a more successful speech. Also, try to seek whether or not your audience has had prior exposure, or whether or not your audience has heard this message before and if so, how they responded. Piece all of these factors together, and determine your audience’s disposition, their likely attitude towards your message: hostile, neutral, or sympathetic Gathering information about your audience: Survey, fixed-response questions, scaled questions, open-ended questions Situational audience analysis is necessary because your audience may not be EXACTLY what you may have anticipated beforehand, so instead of expressing surprise, merely analyze your speech and adjust accordingly. For example, shortened time, cut out a main point or expedite your speech, etc. Chapter 6: Selecting your topic Developing a set of potential topics: Research some topics, brainstorm, use word association Use mind-mapping Selecting the best topic: Consider the assignment, see if an assignment can cater to the requirements or instructions set by your instructor
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Consider your audience – what will interest your audience, is it something your listeners need to know about, and will it likely inspire, entertain, or emotionally move them?
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