Results Only licensed MPPC firms could make films with Eastman Kodak stock Only

Results only licensed mppc firms could make films

This preview shows page 3 - 6 out of 33 pages.

Results
Image of page 3
- Only licensed MPPC firms could make films with Eastman Kodak stock - Only licensed companies could release films - And theaters wanting to exhibit MPPC films had to pay weekly fee - MPPC tries to control every aspect of filmmaking - 1908- MPPC is responsible for virtually 100% of U.S. film production - Danish and Italian firms are shut out from the U.S. market - But, among nation’s 8,000 or so theaters, only 6,000 agree to MPPC’s terms - Those theaters providing market unlicensed producers and distributors, known as the independents Emergence of the Narrative Short (1 reel) - 3 filmmakers in U.S., France and Great Britain pioneer the first narrative short - George Melies’ A Trip To The Moon - 1902 - France - Edwin Porter’s The Great Train Robbery (1903) - U.S.A. - Cecil Hepworth’s Rescued By Rover (1906) - Great Britain - All one reel films (7-12 minutes) since this is the standard set by MPPC Edwin S. Porter - Porter was Edison’s principal director - Drew from techniques of other filmmakers and Melies in particular, examining Trip To The Moon in order to copy it’s structure of telling a story through a series of shots - 1903 he makes The Great Train Robbery - All 3 shorts combine multiple shots in different locations into a sequence to tell a simple story - Great Train Robbery and Rescued By Rover also use various camera angles - not just full frontal views of action Exam next wednesday 2/1 The Independents Fight Back
Image of page 4
- 1909: Carl Laemmle who ran largest U.S. distribution firm quits membership with MPPC - Starts Independent Motion Picture Company - Laemmle helps organize distribution exchanges to reach out to remaining independent theaters. - William Fox made 1st breakthrough into middle-class audiences by establishing chains of vaudeville halls where movies played as half the bill - Adolph Zukor merged part of his nickelodian chain with large theater holdings of Marcus Loew - Zukor’s idea to draw middle-class crowds was to make longer, more expensive films modeled after theater and Film d’Art, which he distributed in U.S. - So he makes feature length films of plays using well-known stage actors with his Famous Players Film Company, distributing films exclusively through Paramount. - 1912: U.S. Supreme Court begins proceedings against MPPC as a trust (a group of companies acting in unfair constraint of a trade) finding them guilty - By 1915: MPPC effectively dethroned - Independents begin consolidating their companies into Hollywood studios Formation of Hollywood and Classical Narrative New Theaters, New Audience, New Narrative - New middle class audiences begin to attend movies - U.S. companies would have to compete with Film d’Art and Italian spectacles - The glut of distribution exchanges created to “outwit” Edison’s MPPC resulted in these exchanges releasing films with longer running times to distinguish them from MPPC films capped at no longer than 2 reels (20-24 minutes) - 1904-1917: system of storytelling conventions and visual principles used to make narrative films is worked out - Edwin S. Porter and D.W. Griffith are 2 leading pioneers in U.S. regarding the
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 33 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • Kociemba
  • History of film, Cinema of the United States, films, Experimental film, dull girl

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes