htw 309 research paper

You can make meals that are healthier and inexpensive

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You can make meals that are healthier and inexpensive. Instead of frying your food which is high in saturated fats, grill or bake your food. Grilled and baked foods are lower in saturated fats and thus lower in cholesterol (Cooper, 2000). Instead of eating French fries substitute that for a salad or baked potato. For the older population where some of these things aren’t an option it has been proven that taking an aspirin can help to reduce your risk of heart disease overall because it decreases the amount of platelets that block blood from traveling to the heart (Cooper, 2000). Conclusion As you can see heart disease as a whole is the number one killer of people in America. Even though it has such crippling effects, most of the outcomes are preventable. The different incidence rates that exist among different geographic, gender, age, socioeconomic, and ethnic groups can all show significant improvement if they follow the proper preventative measures. By changing your eating habits from consuming unhealthy foods to healthier foods you can decrease your chances of having coronary heart disease (Cooper, 2000). Becoming more active and exerting yourself physically has also shown to help with reducing your risk.
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Cromer References American Heart Association. “What is Cardiovascular Disease (Heart Disease)? .” National Health Council . N.p., Dec. 2011. Web. 2 Apr. 2012. <http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Caregiver/Resources/WhatisCardiovascularDisease/ What-is-Cardiovascular-Disease_UCM_301852_Article.jsp>. Chiu, M. “Ethnic Groups Show Different Cardiovascular Risk Profiles: Chinese Have Lowest Levels of Heart Disease While South Asians Have Highest.” Science News (Apr. 2010): n. pag. Science Daily . Web. 2 Apr. 2012. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100419132349.htm>. Cooper, Richard, Jeffrey Cuttler, and Stephen Fortmann. “Findings of the National Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.” Circulation (2000): n. pag. American Heart Association . Web. 2 Apr. 2012. <http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/102/25/3137.full>. USA.GOV. “Heart Disease Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . N.p., 23 Mar. 2012. Web. 2 Apr. 2012. <http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm>. US Preventative Task Force. “Heart Disease and Stroke.” Healthy People 2020 . N.p., 27 Mar. 2012. Web. 2 Apr. 2012. <http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/ebr.aspx?topicId=21>.
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