Cold fireplace bricks painted white A rush of feathery air as it warms my upper

Cold fireplace bricks painted white a rush of

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Cold fireplace bricks painted white. A rush of feathery air as it warms my upper arm. The log is lit using its outer covering of green paper; the flame burgeons and curls away its clothes, revealing an intense, charming fire that I sit beside. My father’s blue lighter withdraws. A still pond, frozen in some spots but not others. A naked willow tree sways slightly, caught in an abandoned web of frost and sub-zero temperatures. The water looks grey, it looks blue. An average day I know will pass quickly into night. A dance stuck inside of me, something between euphoria and frustration. I want to run in the snow, barefoot and shaking. I want to feel it kiss the soles of my feet. I want to feel the winter. After reading through “Those Winter Sundays” I find that I do not find that we share identical views, but there are elements still intact. The fire as it blazes was started by Hayden’s father; so was mine. The idea
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Olivia Harris Mrs. T-O AP Literature and Composition 18 October 2018 of austerity and loneliness is present in both of our views. However, my perspective focuses more on Winter as an object. Hayden sees Winter as a “season” of his life, one that he wishes he could visit and thank his father. Asking questions is the most important part of an initial read-through of a poem. After you ask questions, you can analyze the piece with more depth and vigour than you may have done otherwise. A few questions about “Dog’s Death” by John Updike: What emotions does the poet the cling to and express in this poem? The poet clings to guilt, anger, frustration, darkness, and hate (for his own ignorance). These are extremely common in all forms of grieving. I don’t see any denial in this poem, in fact I see Updike taking responsibility and blame into himself, and coming to terms with his dog’s death. How does Updike grieve and cope through this piece? Would you feel the same as he did? Updike really delves into and expresses his true feelings through this piece. As a coping mechanism, working through and putting your emotions in words is extremely cathartic. Sometimes, writing your feelings down offers a sense of support, even if you are the only reader. The acknowledgement of the validity of inner turmoil shows that you believe yourself. This is allowed, you think, I am not the only person to feel this way. How long after the dog’s death did the poet write this? What was your original notion? Was it a fresh wound, or was it a mildewed heartache? Due to the nature of the loss, I believe it happened sometime after the first period of grieving was over. It is so difficult to put into words right after the fact, so it often takes at least a few months to fully acknowledge and ruminate over the events as a whole. After eight months, mourners are often passed up and not considered to be in the throes of grief. However, I find that at this point, memories and “what ifs” tend to be replaced with “this is fact, and it is painfully real”. I place this poem right around
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