The hypersensitivity goes to such an extent that the word Mohammedan used in

The hypersensitivity goes to such an extent that the

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a kind of ‘Orientalist’, colonial discourse. The hypersensitivity goes to such an extent that the word ‘Mohammedan’, used in place of ‘Islamic’, as in ‘Mohammedan Law’, is held to be an ‘insulting’ designation (p66): Said obviously forgets that innumerable Muslim scholars down the centuries have also spoken (in Persian) of Din-i Muhammadi (Muhammedan faith), or Shari‘at-i Muhammadi (Muhammedan law), without at all being conscious of any insult implied in such use of the Prophet’s name. But with the aggressive stance of modern Islamic ‘orthodoxy’, the word ‘Mohammedan’ is quickly disappearing from books, and even from titles of works by authors long dead: thus Goldziher’s Mohammedanische Studien and H A R Gibb’s Mohammedanism now reappear in print respectively as Muslim Studies (English translation) and Islam in editions by established academic publishers. An innocent designation becomes disreputable the moment it is found to be tainted through association with that pernicious weed, ‘Orientalism’. The alternative doesn’t solve- Chinese Occidentalism is a mirror image of western orientalism, which means that switching to Chinese literature isn’t necessarily beneficial. Gries, 07 (Peter Hays Harmony, Hegemony, and Us China Relations Peter Hays Gries is the Harold J. & Ruth Newman Chair in U.S.-China Issues and director of the University of Oklahoma's Institute for U.S.-China Issues. Gries is also a professor of international and area 128
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Orientalism K SDI 3-Week 2016 studies, specializing in Chinese nationalism, as well as Chinese domestic and foreign policy. .) Chinese Occidentalism has thus involved a discourse of similarity to the United States; it also includes a vital discourse of difference. And it is this discourse that is ascendant. Chinese nationalist texts today are full of references to Western and American “selfishness,” “materialism,” “conflict/discord,” and “impersonal coldness” that seek to construct an Eastern and Chinese “beneficence,” “spiritualism,” “harmony,” and “warmheartedness.” This discourse of difference has arisen at a time when more and more Chinese have expressed anxiety about the rise of materialism and conflict in a rapidly modernizing China that has now experienced almost thirty years of “reform and opening.” Unwanted traits like selfishness and aggressiveness have been thrust upon the Western Other to reassert traditional Chinese values like beneficence and harmony. This process is reminiscent of the way eighteenth-century European liberals projected their fears about their own passions and society (“the mob”) onto the “Orient,” seeking to construct the Enlightenment vision of themselves as rational individuals. Indeed, twenty-first-century Chinese Occidentalism replicates many of the same dichotomies and epistemologies long central to Western Orientalism Said is wrong- the so called “orientalists” historically are anti-imperialists.
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