walks of life with varying mental health diagnoses but almost a third of them

Walks of life with varying mental health diagnoses

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walks of life with varying mental health diagnoses, but almost a third of them experienced some sort of discrimination while seeking treatment. It is true that as a nation we have made headway, but we are still treating transgender people as outcasts. Many people that identify as transgender have a hard time going through life with such a title. For children that have gender dysphoria it is a lot harder on those closest to them. A lot of parents have trouble coming to terms that their young child knows who and what they are does not fit the body they were born into. Some come around to the idea and embrace their child for who they are like Laurie Frankel. Frankel’s son loved dressing up in a tutu and fairy wings. At first, he only wore them at home, then he wore them out in public, and then when his friends were over. His parents were torn on whether to tell him to wear whatever he wanted to school or to wear what was normal for little boys, so they asked him what he wanted to do. He took his time deciding and the day before the start of first grade he said he wanted to wear skirts and dresses. Reasonably they were a little shocked at first, but then they asked an important question. “What do you think the other kids will say tomorrow if you wear a dress to school?” and he knew what they could say, and he still wanted to be himself. They went
Taylor 4 and bought enough outfits to get him through the week in case he changed his mind. They set him up for success by role-playing scenarios that could happen and how he could react appropriately. The first week of school was a little rough because a few kids were pestering him, but when his mom told him he did not have to keep wearing the skirts and dresses if he did not want to, he was adamant when he said “no, mama.” After the first month of school the teasing had basically stopped. Frankel said, “she stopped telling people he was a boy in a skirt and started being a girl in a skirt” (649). If only everyone had someone this supportive and accepting.

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