In fact the typical voter in texas remains as always

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educated, and minorities to vote, that does not necessarily mean they have voted. In fact, the typical voter in Texas remains, as always, a wealthy, White, educated person over the age of 40 . While men have traditionally voted at a greater rate than women, that is no longer the case, with women and men voting at about the same rate and women even voting at a slightly higher rate than men . Let's take a look at each of these characteristics and see if we can figure out why these groups are more likely to vote. Education: The single best demographic characteristic to predict the likelihood of voting is a person’s education. We know that the more educated a person is, the more likely he or she is to cast a ballot, to the point where folks with Ph.D.'s, can be counted on to vote more than 90% of the time . Once again, there are several theories as to why this is the case. First, people with a higher degree of education have a better understanding of the political system and are less likely to be intimidated by the prospect of voting. The cost of getting informed for the election is lower for someone who is educated. Second, educated citizens are more confident and more likely to believe they can make a difference-again, the concept of political efficacy .
Gender: While women historically voted less than men, that is no longer the case. Now, women vote at the same or at a slightly higher rate than men for a couple of reasons. First, while women do not make as much as men on average, a much higher proportion of women are now better educated and in more professional jobs. Women are now much more like the typical voter than they were 30 years ago in terms of education and income. Second, there are now more women candidates and elected officials . In 2016, there were a record number of women in the United States Congress, and the Texas Legislature, and a woman (Hillary Clinton) was the first female candidate nominated for President by a major political party. As women have become a more active voting bloc, issues important to women (abortion, child care, pay equity) have become more important. Required Written Lecture 2-15: Individual Participation- Who Votes? Who Votes? continued Third, more educated citizens are likely to have the kinds of jobs that will allow them time off to vote because they are likely to hold more professional jobs . Fourth, we know that education and income are closely linked, therefore, educated people are more likely to be wealthy (and have more at stake), and the wealthy vote more . Finally, it has sometimes been argued, not always in jest, that people with a college education are used to standing in lines , so standing in line to vote is no big deal! Seriously, your college experience prepares you for the bureaucracy necessary to vote-that is nothing after dealing with university bureaucracy! Interestingly, education is not such an important predictor in other countries as it is in America.

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