NGOs in Los Angeles Shih provides an in depth description and analysis of what

Ngos in los angeles shih provides an in depth

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NGOs in Los Angeles, Shih provides an in-depth description and analysis of what she calls "vigi lante rescue" efforts. While the assumptions of these anti-trafficking NGOs mirror those of feder ally funded anti-trafficking sweeps and stings, these groups do not collaborate with federal or local policing agents. Shih finds distinct gendered and racialized patterns in the work of these organizations, with many white college age men eager to "rescue" young women of Asian descent, with both orga nizations deploying tactics of racial profiling to "identify those in need of rescue and those who may be perpetrators of trafficking" (Shih 2016, this issue). Shih argues that these "vigilante res cue" efforts represent a new form of neoliberal governance, bringing non-state actors in to "enforce and extend state goals of surveillance and policing of immigrants and sex workers" (Shih 2016, this issue). This special cluster concludes with Crystal A. Jackson's article, "Framing Sex Worker Rights: How U.S. Sex Worker Rights Activists Perceive and Respond to Mainstream Anti-Sex Trafficking Advocacy." Jackson's ethnographic research with sex worker advocacy networks in the United States documents how the anti-trafficking narrative has affected the sex worker rights movement. Jackson describes both the importance and difficulty of articulating sex worker positive narra tives in a contemporary moment of heightened surveillance and criminalization of everything pertaining to commercial sex. While sex worker activists also wish to fight coercion and traffick ing in the sex industry, when they do not acknowledge themselves as victims, anti-trafficking activists and state actors label them criminals, and their work on behalf of actual victims is at best marginalized, and at worst thwarted. Jackson's article adds to scholarly understandings of fram ing battles within social movements, and illustrates how labor rights frames struggle as counter stories in a neoliberal political climate. Conclusion The evidence in these three sociological studies run counter to dominant discourses abo work and human trafficking. Because sociologists are often at the forefront of advocati evidence-based policies, we hope that these essays will assist sociologists in their w This content downloaded from 152.46.28.191 on Sun, 16 Feb 2020 01:22:39 UTC All use subject to
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22 Sociological Perspectives 59(1) teachers, scholars, and public advocates. Finally, we urge policy makers and activists who are concerned about individuals in the sex trade to heed these and other peer reviewed empirical studies and push for evidence-based policies on sex work and human trafficking. Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank the editors of Sociological Perspectives, Robert O'Brien and James Elliot, for their thoughtfulness, constructive support, and courage in hosting the first ever special cluster of articles in Sociological Perspectives.
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