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PHRM 514 STD's Fall 2012 (1)

May lead to permanent neurologic damage knodel lc

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May lead to permanent neurologic damage Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a  pathophysiologic approach.  8th ed.  New York:  McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028.
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Genital Herpes:  Diagnosis n Genital ulcers or mucocutaneous  lesions § Culture or PCR n Type specific antibody tests available  to distinguish HSV1 and HSV2 Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a  pathophysiologic approach.  8th ed.  New York:  McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.  MMWR  2010;59(RR-12):1-116.
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Trichomoniasis
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Trichomoniasis Statistics n Estimated overall prevalence 2001-2004 =  3.1% Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2010.  Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2011.
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Trichomoniasis n Trichomonas vaginalis n Flagellated, motile protozoan n Most commonly spread through sexual contact n May survive on moist surfaces up to 45 minutes § Communal bathing § Infected bath or toilet articles n More common in females than males Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a  pathophysiologic approach.  8th ed.  New York:  McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028.
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Trichomoniasis:  Pathophysiology 1. Trichomonads attach to vaginal or urethral  mucosa  2. Elicit an inflammatory response  3. Manifests as discharge containing large  numbers of PMN leukocytes Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a  pathophysiologic approach.  8th ed.  New York:  McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028.
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Trichomoniasis:  Clinical  Presentation Males Females Incubation  Period 3-28 days 3-28 days Most  Common Site  of Infection Urethra Endocervical  canal Other Sites of  Infection Rectum, eye,  oropharynx Urethra, eye,  rectum,  oropharynx Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a  pathophysiologic approach.  8th ed.  New York:  McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028.
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Trichomoniasis:  Clinical  Presentation Males Females Symptoms Asymptomatic or minimally  symptomatic Clear to purulent urethral  discharge, dysuria, pruritus  Asymptomatic or minimally  symptomatic Scant to copious,  malodorous, vaginal  discharge, pruritus,  dysuria, dysparenunia  Signs Urethral discharge Vaginal discharge, vaginal  pH 4.5-6,  inflammatory/erythema of  vulva, vagina, and/or  cervix, urethritis Knodel, LC.  Sexually transmitted diseases.  In:  DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors.  Pharmacotherapy a 
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