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Q what processes are required for cell to produce

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Q: What processes are required for cell to produce viral proteins to function as capsids and envelope proteins for new viruses? Image: Source unknown . From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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Four basic steps: 1. Recognize & attach to host cell. 2. Infect (get inside) host cell. 3. Force cell to manufacture viruses. 4. New viruses exit the host cell . Image: Source unknown . How Do Viruses Reproduce? From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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Most commonly released through cell ______. Enzyme called endolysin, is coded for in the viral nucleic acid of lytic phages. Endolysin attacks and breaks down bacteria’s cell wall peptidoglycan. Infected bacterium is destroyed as a result. 4a. How do new phages exit host bacterium? Image: Bacteriophage Cell Lysis, Suly12 From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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Depends whether or not they have an ________ . Naked viruses After construction of capsid, naked viruses may be released from animal cell through exocytosis or may cause lysis and death of cell. Enveloped viruses Often released through a process called budding . Virus exits cell with part of cell’s plasma membrane. 4b. How do new animal viruses exit host cell? Image: Viral life cycle , National Academy of Sciences; Rubella virions budding , PHIL # 10220 From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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Let’s take a look at: How A Virus Invades Your Body an animated video from NPR . Image: Viral life cycle , National Academy of Sciences From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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More about Bacteriophages Image: Bacteriophages attached to a bacterial cell, Graham Colm From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
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The ______ ______ of Bacteriophages Image: Bacteriophage Lytic Replication , Suly12 Phage Cycles Let’s take a look at: Steps in Replication of T4 Phage an animated video and quiz from McGraw-Hill.
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