The New Jersey Plan refuted the Virginia Plan and stated that there should be a

The new jersey plan refuted the virginia plan and

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state. The New Jersey Plan refuted the Virginia Plan and stated that there should be a single- house Congress in which each state would cast one vote. A compromise was made where there would be a two-house Congress with a Senate, consisting of two members from every state, and d a House of Representatives, consisting of members according to the population of the state. Senators would be chosen by the state legislature every six months and the Representatives would be chosen by the public vote every 2 years. Part II Federalist: people who supported the ratification of the constitution. They believed it was there to protect them and abuse of power was impossible. Federalist was also a book created in 1798 that compiled a series of eighty-five essays written by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay that were published in the newspapers under the pen name Publius. These essays were written during the time when the states were deciding to ratify the Constitution or not. Each state was electing delegates for a special ratifying convention, and to generate support for the Constitution, Hamilton, Madison, and Jay wrote these essays in the newspaper. Out of the eighty-five, Hamilton wrote fifty, Madison wrote thirty, and Jay wrote five. These essays became very popular and are now considered as very important contributions to American politics. But during the time, they were just part of the huge see of articles, pamphlets, and essays that were written in support for different candidates.
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Anti-Federalists: group of people that were against the ratification of the Constitution. The Anti-Federalists had leaders such as Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Patrick Henry, but they lacked unified leadership that the Federalists had. The Anti-Federalists believed that the Constitution took too much liberty away and swayed the balance more to the side of power. They believed that the central government was far too strong than necessary and it would be greatly influenced by merchants, creditors, and other people that didn’t have the same ideas as ordinary people. The thought that liberty flourished when there are smaller governments ruling smaller areas which creates an environment of trust and self-government. If there was a strong central government, it would mostly be ruled by wealthy people who had the resources to win an election. Their biggest argument was that the Constitution didn’t have a Bill of Rights, even though the states had a Bill of Rights, they had to hand their power over to the federal government. In the end, the Constitution was ratified by eleven out of the thirteen states, Rhode Island and North Carolina voted against, and all states had to accept the Constitution. The Anti-Federalists eventually died out. Bill of Rights: the first ten amendments of the Constitution that contained freedoms of speech, the press, and religion, and protection against unjust criminal procedures ratified in 1791. All the state legislatures included some form of declaration of the citizens’ rights and they wanted the Constitution to have one too. So to satisfy their needs, Madison wrote a bunch of
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