after the Persian city Mostly single varietal wines but some Rhone Rangers

After the persian city mostly single varietal wines

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, after the Persian city -Mostly single-varietal wines, but some Rhone Rangers labeled as GSM, MSG, etc. -South Australia: generally good wines -Southeast Australia: 95% of the country’s wine production, including Yellowtail -includes all of Australia except Western Australia -Grange (originally named Granges-Hermitage) is the most expensive wine in the country, occasionally made with just Shiraz, but much more often blended with various others 48) : - 49) : Shiraz, Grenache (GSM’s) - 50) : Shiraz, Grenache (GSM’s) - 51) : “Bordeaux of South Australia”; Cabernet Sauvignon - 52) : High-quality Riesling -All Australian riesling uses screwcaps 53)______________________ - 54) : Chardonnay, Semillon, icewine 55) (island): coolest region in nation; R1, mainly sparkling wines New Zealand -First nation to switch entirely to screwcaps for Sauvignon Blanc South Island: (both islands produce wine, but the best-known wines come from here) - 56) : Sauvignon Blanc: “fruit salad in a glass” - 57) : R1, esp. Pinot Noir - 58) : Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc Review %’s: 75/85/95: CA: Varietal/AVA/Vintage 75/100/95: OR: Cabernet Sauvignon/Place Name/Vintage 90/100/95: OR: Other Varietal/Place Name/Vintage 75/100/95: WA: Varietal/Place Name/Vintage 85/85/95: Canada: Varietal/Place Name/Vintage
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2/2/13 Created by Alex Holyk: [email protected] Worksheet 3: France Section 1: Alsace, Champagne, and the Loire French Appellation Levels 1) : Appellation d’Origine Protégée or 2) : Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée -AOP was intended to replace AOC, but now either may be used -this is the category for practically all fine wine in France -all crus, premier crus, grand crus, etc. are also part of this category -ex: “Appellation Pauillac Protégée” or “Appellation Pauillac Contrôlée” 3) : Indication Geographique Protégée or 4) : “country wine” -IGP was intended to replace Vin de Pays , but now either may be used -protected place name for wines that don’t meet requirements for AOP/AOC -90% varietal if listed, 85% location as listed -ex: “Vin de Pays d’Oc” or “Pays d’Oc IGP” in the Languedoc-Roussillon 5) (formerly Vin de Table ) -least stringent regulations; generally the cheapest and lowest quality -varietal and vintage may appear, but often just labeled red/rouge or white/blanc Terminology - 6) (great growth) is a higher rank than 7) (first growth) -Bordeaux has its own ranking systems -Two prominent regions which have never been ranked are 8) (in Bordeaux) and the 9)____________________ - 10) : in France, this middleman buys grapes and produces and sells wines - 11)“ : the same as “estate- bottled” -Crémant de/d’(French wine region): 12) used for second fermentation; ex: “Crémant d’Alsace” or “Crémant de Bourgogne” Alsace -Labels by 13)______________ -Protected from excessive rainfall by the rain shadow of the 14)___________________ -Highest ranking: 15) (then Premier Cru); vineyards receive the designation -Varietals (in order of production): - 16) (produced in a dry style) - 17) (produced in a dry style) - 18) (produced in a full-bodied style) - 19) - 20) (not much; for reds and rosés) -Sweet wines: (these cannot be chaptalized) - 21) (Late Harvest) - 22) (Botrytis-affected; noble rot)
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2/2/13 Created by Alex Holyk: [email protected] Loire Valley -Labels by 23)____________ -Highest ranking: 24)__________________
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