Figure 222 informational and analytical reports

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Figure 22.2 Informational and Analytical Reports
Figure 22.1 provides an overview of when to use informational and analytical reports tocommunicate your business messages (Business Communication Essentials , 2016).Unit 38: Report OrganizationIntroductionBecause reports vary by size, format, and function, writing them involves adjusting to the needs ofthe audience while respecting conventions and guidelines. Reports are typically organized aroundsix key elements, the 5Ws + H:1.Whom the report is about and/or prepared for2.What was done, what problems were addressed, and the results, including conclusionsand/or recommendations3.Where the subject studied occurred4.When the subject studied occurred5.Why the report was written (function), including under what authority, for what reason, orby whose request6.How the subject operated, functioned, or was usedPay attention to these essential elements when you consider your stakeholders, or those who havean interest in the report. That may include the person(s) the report is about, whom it is for, and thelarger audience of the business, organization, or industry. Ask yourself who are the key decisionmakers reading the report, who the experts or technicians will be, and how executives and workersmay interpret your words and images.(Business Communication for Success, 2015)Organization PatternAlthough reports have the same sections, the audience, purpose and content of a report willinfluence the report’s organizing pattern:direct or indirect.Direct PatternDirect reports contain routine, nonsensitive information. Reports using this organizing pattern willpresent the most important findings first followed by facts, data and other explanatory details. Thus,the direct approach is most appropriate forinformational reports. In addition, when the receiver
is likely to be in agreement with and accepting of the report’s information and recommendations,the direct approach can also be applied toanalytical reports.This approach allows the receiver toaccess relevant information in a quick, efficient and easy to follow manner.Figure 38.1 presentsorganizing pattern of a direct report.
Indirect PatternAn indirect approach may contain sensitive, controversial, debated or unpleasant information. As aconsequence, not all readers will be knowledgeable of, in agreement with, or accepting of theinformation and/or recommendations made in the report. For this reason, the indirect approach isused when the audience must be educated about or persuaded of the credibility of the informationpresented and merits of the recommendations made. An indirect report presents the facts, dataand other explanatory details before presenting its conclusions and recommendations. Since onlyanalytical reports present recommendations, the indirect approach is used exclusively withanalyticalreports. (Business Communication Essentials, 2016;Communicating for Results, 2017)Figure38.2shows the organizing pattern of a indirect report.
Ordering InformationIn addition to determining if your report will use the direct or indirect approach, information must

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Term
Summer
Professor
Tatiana Tsvinda
Tags
Sales, Request for proposal, Call for bids, Informal Reports

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