Understanding decision making in terms of emotional

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  Understanding decision making in terms of emotional coherence enables us to appreciate the merits of both intuition and calculation as contributors to effective practical reasoning and good decision  making.   a)      Decision As Intuition   Suppose you are a student trying to decide whether to study liberal arts, in which you have a strong  interest or a subject such as economics or computer science that may lead to a more lucrative  career. To make this decision intuitively is just to go with the option supported by your emotional  reactions to the two alternatives. In the end, the intuitive decision makers choose an option based on what their emotional reactions tell them is preferable.       i)                    Advantages of Decision as Intuition   Speed:  The advantage of intuitive decision-making is speed. An emotional reaction can be immediate and lead directly to a decision. If your choice is between vanilla and chocolate ice  cream, it would be pointless to spend a lot of time deliberating about the advantages and  disadvantages of the two flavours. Instead, an emotional reaction such as “chocolate-yum!”  can make for a quick appropriate decision. Interest:  Another advantage is that basing your decisions on emotions helps to ensure that the decisions take into account what you really care about. If you are pleased and excited  about a possible action, that is a good sign that the action promises to accomplish the goals  that are genuinely important to you. Action based:  Finally, decisions based on emotional intuitions lead directly to action: the  positive feeling toward an option will motivate you to carry it out. ii)                  Disadvantage of Decision as Intuition   Emotion-based intuitive decision-making can have serious disadvantages.   Failure to consider other options:  An option may seem emotionally appealing because of  failure to consider other available options. Intuition may suggest buying red meat only 
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because you have failed to consider a low-colestrole white meat alternative that would be a  healthier choice. Informed by emotion (cravingness):  Intuition is also subject to the intense craving that  drug addicts call “jonesing.” If you are jonesing for something, e.g. cocaine, githeri, or a  person of opposite sex, your intuition will tell you to choose what you crave, but only because the craving has emotionally swamped or overshadowed other desires that you would be  more aware of when the craving is less intense or not there at all.
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