The us was never paid back 6 why was hoover nominated

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problem, but created another when the Great Depression hit. The U.S. was never paid back. 6. Why was Hoover nominated by the Republicans in 1928? Why did the Democrats nominate Alfred E. Smith? Why was Smith's campaign doomed from the start? Why did Hoover make better use of radio than Smith? What elements of Hoover's personality made him a better candidate than Smith? What were the results of the 1928 presidential election? What were the provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929? What was it necessary? What did the Federal Farm Board do? What was the Hawley-Smoot Tariff of 1930? Why was it necessary?
6. Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover was the rightful successor to Coolidge for the 1928 elections. Although political bosses did not particularly desire him, Hoover was a People’s man, coining the phrase “Hoo but Hoover?” and had a platform entailing prosperity and prohibition. Alfred Smith, the Democrat nominee, was four times New York Governor, witty, and colorful in personality. Though he was in several aspects a great nominee, he had some fatal flaws. For one, he was a rigid urban type individual, Roman Catholic in a Protestant state. Also, he was known for some heavy dealing with alcohol; not the best sign for a nation experimenting with prohibition. Although Smith had a way with people in person, Hoover was able to make dramatic effects over the radio, enchanting listeners with the concept of rugged individualism rather than “un-American socialism.” Hoover’s personality itself made him a better candidate. Known as an orphan boy going on to Stanford, a successful engineer, a smart businessman, a shining proponent of progressivism, and a worldly figure in his travels, Hoover emitted the concept of American success. Consequently, Hoover trumped Smith, winning by a massive landslide in both the popular and electoral votes; he restored majority rule for the Republicans. In the start of the Hoover administration, stocks shot up, meaning riches for the people. However, farmers did not share in these riches. As compensation, Hoover issued the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929. It set up the Federal Farm Board and disposed money so that farmers could “help themselves,” a strong idea of the Hoover administration. In 1930, the Farm Board created the Grain Stabilization Corporation and the Cotton Stabilization Corporation. The goal was to eradicate sagging prices by buying the surplus. Further deepening this situation, much of Hoover’s votes came from farmers that loved his promises of helping the agricultural game. Somewhat forced, the Hawley-Smoot Tariff of 1930 arose, which was supposed to help the farmers out with a little tariff. After the lobbyists were done however, countless amendments were added and the tariff was shot up to 60%, a record-breaking high in times of peace.

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