Ashima still believes in this ideology to the point where she feels weird that

Ashima still believes in this ideology to the point

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as superior than women. Ashima still believes in this ideology to the point where she feels weird that her husband is in the same room while giving birth and to the point that she refuses to call him by his name. Going back to the giving birth tangent, the culture is very different in that instance as well. In India, a woman gives birth at her home surrounded by her family (except bae), while in America, most women are born in a hospital with several doctors and her husband surrounding her. Also, while in the hospital, she is served chicken skin, which is a food explicitly prohibited in India. Finally, family is also extremely different. In India, marriage is arranged by the female’s parents and such is the case with Ashima and Ashoke, and the child she bears is named by her grandmother unlike in America where you have to name the child before leaving the hospital while the parents are the ones to usually name them. Names are a far more quintessential in India than America as well.
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Roseliz Ochoa-Perez Period: 8 12/7/16 2. Three themes are presented in the first chapter of the novel. Of which include “alienation/cultural clashes,” which is represented all throughout the story. Ashima experiences several cultural clashes in Chapter 1 including the fact that she continues to still eat her cultural food, refuses to refer to his husband by his first name, is shocked at how the hospital operates (including their food and that his husband is present), and that her grandmother will not name the child, instead they will. Another theme is “identity.” Ashoke is the central character to this theme. He wants to leave his Bengali life in the past, at one point even being ashamed and lost. It’s only in train ride that he knows that he needs to leave India for America. Though his wife tries to hold on to Bengali traditions, he also wants very much to make their American life work, and he tries hard to fit in in some ways. The last theme is “nationality/heritage,” which is once again mainly portrayed in Ashima. She loves her culture and she loves her heritage/traditions, being extremely faithful to them. She refuses to eat chicken skin because the Hindu religion prohibits it and she is upset at the fact that grandmother would not be able to name the child as that is how she’s used to naming newborns. The most important theme is “alienation/cultural clashes” especially in this first chapter, where it’s the impulse of the rest of the narrative. 3. This novel is written in the third person, limited omniscient which means that the narrator telling the story is not a character in the novel, he’s simply retelling what happens. You can tell this because the author never uses the words “I,” or “me.” Yet, he’s not an omniscient narrator as he’s not completely aware of the feelings and thoughts of every single character. The narrator’s knowledge is limited to a single character, Ashima, while not really knowing the feelings of the other major or minor characters. The author also
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