My rationale for deciding to pursue my degree as an APN is similar to Mary I

My rationale for deciding to pursue my degree as an

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rationale for deciding to pursue my degree as an APN is similar to Mary. I would like to continue to working in a clinical setting where I am providing services to the patients. The clinical setting can be in anoutpatient or inpatient environment as long as I am have the ability to provide care to patients.
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The pros to becoming an APN is advancement in career opportunities, the ability to practice independently, ability to work in various settings, ability to work with specific populations of patients, and the ability to earn more money (Nurse Journal, 2017). A con to pursing an APN degree is difficulty locating clinical sites and preceptors. According to Fitzgerald, Kantrowitz-Gordon, Katz, and Hirsch, the major challenge facing APRN educational programs is the restricted number of available clinical sites andpreceptors (2012). Another con in pursuing an APN degree is the competitiveness of getting into a program. Approximately 17% of graduate nursing programs are extremely selective, and there are deficient openings for eligible applicants (Fitzgerald, Kantrowitz-Gordon, Katz, and Hirsch, 2012). The cost of an APN program can present another con in deciding to obtain an APN degree. According to Fitzgerald, Kantrowitz-Gordon, Katz, and Hirsch, APN costs present challenges to prospective applicants whose educational plans are altered by declines in available employer tuition-reimbursement programs (2012).The four roles of an APN include nurse practitioner (NP), certified nurse-midwife (CNM), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), and clinical nurse specialist (CNS). The first three roles require a license other than the basic registered nurse (RN) license. The role of the clinical nurse specialist does not require separate licensing unless the CNS is applying for prescriptive authority (DeNisco and Barker, 2015). NPs are employed in specialty areas (i.e., cardiology, pediatrics women’s health, and family medicine). NPs provide care to patients (i.e., teaching and advocacy) and assist physicians and other healthcare providers. In some states NPs are able to practice independently in addition to working in physician’s offices and hospitals (Nurse Journal, 2017). CNMs provide several services as a gynecologist and midwife. CNMs assist women with contraceptive control, gynecologic care, and stages of the pregnancy cycle. Nurse midwives spend most of their time helping with births and working in clinical settings (i.e., hospitals) or within the community (i.e., women’s home). In addition, CNMs can establish their own private practice (Nurse Journal, 2017). A CRNA provides anesthesia to patients in various settings. CRNAs are certified to provide a full spectrum of anesthesia care for surgical procedures and may work with patients of all ages and all levels of acuity (Nurse Journal, 2017). A CNS focuses on a specific area of medicine. These areas include: setting (i.e., critical care), population (i.e., pediatrics, adults, and elderly), disease (i.e., CHF, cancer), health problem (i.e. wounds, pain), and care type (i.e., acute rehabilitation. In addition, CNSs can provide primary care to patients within their scope (Nurse
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