25 By the 17th century horses produced in Le Perche had attained widespread

25 by the 17th century horses produced in le perche

This preview shows page 25 - 28 out of 38 pages.

25
Image of page 25
By the 17th century horses produced in Le Perche had attained widespread notoriety and were in demand for many different uses. The Percheron of this time showed less scale and was probably more active. He stood from 15 to 16 hands high. Percherons were first imported to the United States in 1839 The Percheron quickly became the favorite of both the American farmer and the teamster who moved freight on the nations city streets. The Percheron was so popular that by 1930, the government census showed that there were three times as many registered Percherons as the other four draft breeds combined. Following World War II, the invention of the modern farm tractor nearly made the breed extinct. As America modernized and mechanized, the Percheron was all but forgotten. However, a handful of farmers, including many Amish, dedicated to the preservation of the breed, kept it alive through the next twenty years of the draft horse depression. The 1960's, saw a renaissance in the draft horse business as Americans rediscovered it's usefulness. Percherons are now back on small farms and working in the forest. Thousands of Percherons are used for recreation such as hayrides, sleighrides and parades. Percherons are shown in competition hitching and halter classes at many state and county fairs across the country. Percherons are used in advertising and promotion of other businesses. They are a common sight on many streets as the carriage business flourishes in many of our larger cities. Pinto Photograph: National Pinto Horse Registry, P.O. Box 486, Oxford, NY The Pinto horse is a color breed in contrast to most other breeds which are defined by their genetic ancestry. In America, the Pinto is regarded as a proper breed. Pintos 26
Image of page 26
have a dark background coloring and upon this color random patches of white. The Pinto coloration may occur in any breed or specific conformation. However, the Pinto Horse Assocation of America does not accept horses with Appaloosa, Draft, or mule breeding or characteristics. In the American west, the Pinto has traditionally been regarded as a horse the American Indian favored as a war horse since its coloring provided a natural camouflage. The Pinto does not have consistent conformation since it is bred for color. When the darker color is black, the horse is often described as Piebald . When the darker color is anything but black, the horse is described as Skewbald . Pintos may be from a variety of breeds, ranging from Thoroughbred to Miniatures. There are four acknowledged types of conformation however: the Saddle type, Stock type, Hunter type and Racing type. Type is determined by the conformation and background of each horse/pony. The STOCK TYPE Pinto is of predominanty Quarter and Paint breeding and conformation. The HUNTER TYPE Pinto is of predominantly Thoroughbred breeding and conformation. The PLEASURE TYPE Pinto is of predominantly Arabian or Morgan breeding and conformation. The SADDLE TYPE Pinto is American Saddlebred, Tennessee Walking or Missouri Foxtrotter breeding and conformation.
Image of page 27
Image of page 28

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 38 pages?

  • Spring '19
  • Queenee De la Cruz
  • The American, Pinto horse, Arabian horse

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture