revolution among women in patriarchal families and of feu dal hierarchies and

Revolution among women in patriarchal families and of

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revolution among women in patriarchal families and of feu- dal hierarchies and forms of knowledge as they give way to abandoned vineyards. The ethnography begins with the life of Emilia Raugei in a small Tuscan hamlet. Emilia, the major protagonist in this unfolding drama of rural Italian life, is at the age of five contracted to weave straw hats for a global market. This is a hidden form of labor that doesn’t appear in the local census calculations any more than it is counted as analytically sig- nificant in conventional approaches to the study of markets. Yet subcontracting is a vital part of household economies linked with global economies. The participation of Emilia, her friends, and her neighbors in household and other forms of labor furnishes the substantial context for an explanation of demographic change. Women are forced to make rational and sometimes painful choices about the size of their families as they contribute to regional and transnational markets. As the subjects of Krause’s study reorient themselves in rela- tion to shifting processes of capitalism, they acquire fresh ways to perceive the world and remake traditional gendered practices.
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684 American Anthropologist Vol. 113, No. 4 December 2011 This story also addresses the subtle ways that in their quotidian practices people challenge some taken-for-granted hierarchies while complying with and embracing others. Ru- ral Tuscan shareholders who have very few children are nevertheless perceived by an educated urban elite as back- ward “rabbit breeders.” These same rural dwellers com- plain that youth are damaged by consumerism and that “progress” is drawing them backward, yet they also seem to participate in a new set of expectations that status can be achieved and to measure themselves against the urban elite. Intentionally or not, Krause’s ethnography describes rather conservative protagonists who challenge only those social conventions that are obstacles to their own personal survival or advancement. In the end, this is a world mixed with resistance, flexibility, and conformity. One is left to wonder how such characters are responding to the contem- porary immigration of people from many different back- grounds and how these immigrants’ presence is contribut- ing to another reworking of sedimented hierarchies in rural Italy. The Lords of Lambityeco: Political Evolution in the Valley of Oaxaca Michael Lind and Javier Urcid, eds. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2010. 412 pp. Ver ´onica P ´erez Rodr´ ıguez Northern Arizona University EditorsMichaelLindandJavierUrcid’s TheLordsofLambityeco is, to date, the definitive volume on this Late Classic site locatedintheValleyofOaxaca.Thesiteisbestknownforthe pioneering work done by John Paddock and his team in the 1960s and 1970s and its impressive elite residential complex withitsfamousfriezesadornedwithstuccoportraitsofruling elite couples (coqui and xonaxi).
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