Than 2008 than the rates for 16 to 19 year olds and

Info icon This preview shows pages 45–48. Sign up to view the full content.

than 2008) than the rates for 16- to 19-year-olds and 20- to 24-year-olds, who normally are thought of as most vulnerable to violence because of their high activity levels and risk taking. Finally, it is surprising how much higher the rates are for the youngest age group of 12- to 15-year-olds, compared to young and middle-aged adults. The rate for 12- to 15-year-olds in 2008 and 2009 was nearly double that for 25- to 34-year-olds. The rate for the young- est age group was more than double that for 35- to 49-year-olds and nearly 4 times that for 50- to 64-year-olds in 2008 and 2009, even after the rates had dropped. Copyright ©2018 by SAGE Publications, Inc. This work may not be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means without express written permission of the publisher. Draft Proof - Do not copy, post, or distribute
Image of page 45

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

350 PART FOUR: Children, Social Problems, and the Future of Childhood The pattern was very similar in 2010 (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2011), but the Bureau of Justice Statistics changed groupings in its reporting begin- ning in 2011. We see rates for 2011 through 2014 in Exhibit 11.6. We see in Exhibit 11.6 that the rates were, for the most part, steady for the three older age groups during the four years as well as being lower (and in most cases much lower) than the younger age groups. For all but one group (18−20), the five youngest age groups rates increased in 2012 and 2013 before decreasing, in most cases rather dramatically, in 2014. However, it is still sobering to see that rates were higher for the youngest age group (12−14-year-olds) compared to the other four groups (25−34, 21−24, 18−20, and 15−17) in all four years, with two exceptions. The rates for 12- to Exhibit 11.5 Victims of Violent Crime Other Than Murder by Age in 2002, 2008, and 2009 3.2 3.1 36.8 42.2 44.4 30.3 37 58.3 28.1 37.8 47.6 21.5 23.4 26.4 16.1 16.7 18.2 10.7 10.7 10.7 3.4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 12 to 15 16 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 64 65 + Per 1,000 Population 2002 2008 2009 Sources: Bureau of Justice Statistics (2009, 2010). Copyright ©2018 by SAGE Publications, Inc. This work may not be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means without express written permission of the publisher. Draft Proof - Do not copy, post, or distribute
Image of page 46
CHAPTER 11: Children, Social Problems, and Society 351 14-year-olds were about the same as those for 21- to 24-year-olds in 2014, while the rates for 18- 20-year-olds were higher (66.2 per 1,000) in 2011 than 12-to 14-year-olds, which were 40.7 per 1,000 in that year. However the youngest age group had the highest increases of all age groups in 2012 and 2013 (with rates of 60.6 and 65.1 respectively). Finally, even after falling dramatically in 2014, the rate for the youngest age group of 31 per 1,000 was higher (in some cases much higher) than all other age groups except for 21- to 24-year-olds, who had just a slightly higher rate (31.3 per 1,000). So while the decrease in victimization over the last three years for the young- est age group is somewhat heartening, it is, as it was in the early years Exhibit 11.6 Victims of Violent Crime Other Than Murder by Age in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 66.2 40.7 60.6 65.1 31 34.9 36 39.2 29.2 45.1 35.9 20.3 36.2 37.9 32.2 31.3 26.5 34.2 29.6 28.5 21.9 29.1 20.3 21.6 13.1 15 18.7 17.9 4.4 5.7 3.1 3.1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 12 to 14 15 to 17 18 to 20 21 to 24 25–34 35–49 50–64 65+ Per 1,000 Population
Image of page 47

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 48
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern