The target of the embargo is the regime the communist system the officials

The target of the embargo is the regime the communist

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The target of the embargo is the regime, the communist system, the officials, bureaucrats and order-takers in uniforms. Flexibility and pragmatism in dealing with human contacts, interactions between U.S. citizens and real, non-political Cubans, seeking a little improvement in their lives merits a graduated, compassionate review of visits, contacts and remittances. Calling unconditionally for a normalized relationship with Raul Castro’s Cuba under the present conditions would be like advocating an unrestricted relationship between the U.S. and South Africa when the National Party was in power and Nelson Mandela languished in Robben Island or demanding that the East Germans stay put under communist rule with the Stasi intact once the Wall fell. Is this the way most Americans wish to end the game? 20
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George Mason 2012-13 [File Name] [Name] Turn – Environment Cuban embargo protects the waters-prevents Cuba from oil-drilling Claver-Carone, ‘8 , Mauricio Claver-Carone is a director of the U.S.-Cuba Democracy PAC in Washington and formerly served as an attorney with the U.S. Treasury. 7/25/08 Mauricio, “How the Cuban embargo protects the environment”, AP The energy debate in the United States introduces one more powerful argument in support of current U.S. policy toward Cuba: environmental protection. For years the Castro brothers have been courting foreign oil companies, and in recent years none have been courted more assiduously than China's Sinopec. Why Sinopec? The answer is simple: If the Chinese were to start drilling in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Cuba - so very close to the coast of Florida - it would send a "red scare" through the halls of the U.S. Congress, creating a new and otherwise improbable coalition for unilaterally lifting the current embargo. Longtime advocates of lifting trade sanctions against Cuba would join with conservative Republicans, who, though they now support the trade embargo, are strong advocates for allowing U.S. companies to drill offshore, and with liberal environmentalists who would rather have strictly regulated U.S. companies drilling than unregulated Chinese companies. In Cuba that looks like a winning trifecta for changing U.S. policy. As early as 2006, the Reuters news bureau in Cuba was reporting: "Havana is eager to see American oil companies join forces with the anti-embargo lobby led by U.S. farmers who have been selling food to Cuba for four years." In recent weeks this strategy has taken center stage in Washington with political and public opinion leaders openly discussing the irony of "the Chinese drilling 60 miles from Florida's coast," while U.S. law prevents American companies from doing the same along the outer continental shelf.
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