For 3 years the natives terrorized a string of

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For 3 years the natives terrorized a string of Massachusetts towns, killing over a thousand people b. But beginning in 1676, the white settlers gradually prevailed, enlisting a group of Mohawk allies who ambushed Metacomet and killed him c. Without Metacomet, the fragile alliance among the tribes collapsed and the white settlers were soon able to crush the uprising 20. Flintlock rifle : relatively new European weapon that the Indians acquired by the Europeans; the conflicts between natives and settlers were crucially affected by earlier exchanges of technology between the English and the tribes a. This rifle could be held up without support and fired without a match
b. This was partly responsible for the very high casualties on both sides in King Philip’s War Discussion Questions/Topics: 1. Discuss the founding and settlement of Plymouth Plantation. A discontented congregation of Puritan Separatists in England (unconnected to the Plymouth Company) established the first enduring European settlement in New England. In 1608, a congregation of Separatists from the English hamlet of Scrooby began emigrating quietly (and illegally), a few at a time, to Leyden, Holland, where they believed they could enjoy freedom of worship. But as foreigners in Holland, they had to work at unskilled and poorly paid jobs. They also watched with alarm as their children began to adapt to Dutch society and drift away from their church. Finally, some of the Separatists decided to move again, across the Atlantic; there, they hoped to create a stable, protected community where they could spread “the gospel of the Kingdom of Christ in those remote parts of the world.” In 1620, leaders of the Scrooby group obtained permission from the Virginia Company to settle in Virginia. The “Pilgrims,” as they saw themselves, sailed from Plymouth, England, in September 1620 on the Mayflower; thirty-five “saints” (Puritan Separatists) and sixty-seven “strangers” (people who were not part of the congregation) were aboard. In November, after a long and difficult voyage, they sighted land—the shore of what is now Cape Cod. That had not been their destination, but it was too late in the year to sail farther south. So the Pilgrims chose a site for their settlement in the area just north of the cape, a place John Smith had labeled “Plymouth” on a map he had drawn during his earlier exploration of New England. Because Plymouth lay outside the London Company’s territory, the settlers were not bound by the company’s rules. While still aboard ship, the saints in the group drew up an agreement, the Mayflower Compact, to establish a government for themselves. Then, on December 21, 1620, they stepped ashore at Plymouth Rock. The Pilgrims’ first winter was a difficult one. Half the colonists perished from malnutrition, disease, and exposure. But the colony survived, in large part because of crucial assistance from local Indians. Trade and other exchanges with the Indians were critical to the settlers and attractive to the natives. The tribes provided the colonists with furs. They also showed the settlers

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