MN 506 Case study. GroupC. Unit 7-3.docx

Society of new york hospital 1914 it is now an

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be done to her body was violated and the doctor was guilty of battery (Schoendorff v. Society of New York Hospital, 1914). It is now an established protocol that a general consent form is signed upon admission at any healthcare facility. This gives permission for routine care, minor procedures, like blood draws, intravenous therapy, monitoring of vital signs and X-rays. The doctrine of informed consent rests on the assumption that the patient and or decision maker are fully informed of the intervention to be done, alternatives and risks of the interventions. It is also assumed that the patient and or decision maker trust the physicians knowledge, clinical expertise and skills when invasive interventions is proposed as in the case of Mrs. Carpenter who had total hip replacement done at Caring Memorial Hospital.
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CASE STUDY II 8 The treating healthcare provider, Dr. Washington, must disclose accurate and appropriate information to the patient and her surrogate decision maker, Mr. Carpenter, in regards to the procedure to be done and the risks involved including death. Rock & Hoebeke (2014) state “accurately informing the patient about the particulars of a surgery or procedure is clearly in the realm of the physician’s education and expertise” (p. 191). For the informed consent to be regarded as authentic the patient and or surrogate must be competent and therefore mentally capable of understanding the information that was presented by Dr. Washington. It must be explained in laymen’s terms and interpreters must be provided if the patient speaks a second language. The patient must also be provided with ample time to reflect and weigh the consequences of the decision before signing any document. Questions and answers are encouraged to ensure that the patient or surrogate decision maker are fully cognizant of the pro and cons of the decisions that they are about to make. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter must be put at ease during this period as all their fears should be addressed. The advanced practice nurse should take this opportunity to reinforce the doctor’s explanation if the patient has additional questions and offer further explanation if necessary. Obtaining an informed consent is not only medically necessary but physicians are ethically obligated to inform patients or their surrogate decision makers of intervention and possible risks (Karim, Alkhowaiter, Bressler & Yoshida 2013). Joseph Alsoff the LPN and the post-surgical nurse witnessed the consent but did not recall the doctor mentioning that death could occur as a result of the surgery. Unfortunately, there was not a written note by Dr. Washington or Judy Gouda the NP to state otherwise. When the details of the surgery are adequately explained and the patient and surrogate are content with the answers and explanations, the informed consent is signed. The nurse in the scenario provided witnessed that the patient was lucid and gave consent voluntarily and that she was the one who
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CASE STUDY II 9 signed the document. If at any time the nurse felt that patient was not appropriately informed
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