Guided by his father he threw himself into the work

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editing these manuscripts into the long coherent treatise that they became in his hands. Guided by  his father he threw himself into the work of the philosophical radicals, and began an active literary  career. n 1830 Mill was introduced to Harriet Taylor. Her husband was a druggist whose grandfather had  once been a neighbour of James Mill. The younger Mill rapidly became intimate with Mrs. Taylor,  who profoundly influenced the rest of his life. She was an invalid who lived apart from her husband.  Mill's father highly disapproved of the association between the two. When Mill married Mrs. Taylor in  1851 two years after her husband's death there was a complete estrangement from his mother and  sisters. Mill reports in his  Autobiography  that Harriet was of crucial significance to his intellectual and moral development. Although the reading of Wordsworth works gave the younger Mill a sense of  greater human possibilities, it was Harriet Taylor who kept this sense alive, and continually  strengthened Mill’s conception of the real end of human being as the progressive development of  individuality in all, women as well as men, and workers as well as aristocrats. It was she who imbued
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Mill with the sense that if these ends could be developed then it would become clear that at present  human beings were enjoying only a small fraction of the happiness that was possible. It was she  who gave Mill the expansive idea of the good that was to form the new utilitarian end that replaced  the rather rigid and narrow ends described by Bentham and his father. As Mill insisted, she was  ind isp ensable to his later thought. He was nearly inconsolable when she died. It was during a trip to  Europe in 1858 that she fell fatally ill and died at Avignon, where she is buried. For the rest of his life, Mill spent half a year at a house in Avignon so that he could be near to her grave. In 1865 Mill was elected to the House of Commons. Given his reputation and his previous seclusion, his work was subject to immense attention. His performance was generally acclaimed, but he found  himself at odds with the aims of his electors. He was unwilling to compromise his own principles, and as a consequence he failed in his attempt at re-election in 1868. He continued to work, as he had  earlier in his life, for many radical causes. He was particularly concerned among other things, for the  status of women. His later work was made easier by the cooperation of Mrs. Taylor's daughter,  Helen, who in many respects took the latter's place in Mill's life. A number of his important works  were published posthumously by Helen Taylor. Mill surrendered to death in 1873 at Avignon, where 
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