I think nurses are now at a point where everyone needs to know basic quality

I think nurses are now at a point where everyone

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 9 pages.

I think nurses are now at a point where everyone needs to know basic quality and safety language and methods, as well as how to lead teams to identify and implement improvements that make patients safer. I wouldn’t say you need to be an expert but become an educated nurse in areas of quality and how to conduct and lead policy from their start to implementation: The effective application of the concepts for improving patient safety and quality coupled with the following new skills, Teach staff nurses new skills and competency in leading change and quality improvement Projects led by staff nurses Empower the nurses to problem solve and find solutions Use bottom-up organizational change theory is key to the success of policy reviewing and implementation (Kliger, Lacey, Olney, Cox, & Oneil, 2010). I believe it is vital that all providers fully grasp the importance of how their profession impacts quality outcomes. This is not only a professional issue but a fiscal one as well. In 2009, Denham published a compelling article, “The No Outcome, No Income Tsunami Is Here: Are you a Surfer, Swimmer, or Sinker?” in the Journal of Patient Safety using this analogy to explain why organizations that use innovation in their quality work as the central focus will not only survive but also thrive even during these uncertain economic times. Arguably, nurses are the largest unleveraged asset in healthcare and hospitals will need to position nurses differently in the value chain, provide them with organizational change skills and evidenced-based strategies, call them out to the task of being responsible for systemic quality, and allow them the freedom to act at the unit level (Kliger, Lacey, Olney, Cox, & Oneil, 2010). In conclusion I think two ways of reviewing policies as an APRN or RN, is becoming aware of evidence-based practice and then seeing how it is received when integrated. When in positions of change, whether at the state or facility level, remember that a key component in reviewing policy is maintaining sustained practice and implementing further change if needed. © 2018 Laureate Education Inc. 6
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General Notes/Comments Mental health care poses unique and difficult barriers to quality measurement. These barriers include gaps in the evidence base about which treatments are effective; infrastructure and policy barriers intrinsic to mental health (such as less penetration of health information technology and frequent separation of mental and general health care in the organization and financing of care); and underdevelopment of the infrastructure needed for measuring and reporting quality Key infrastructure deficits include few or underdeveloped data collection systems to monitor and track care; insufficient attention to developing and validating mental health performance measures; and infrequent use of outcome measurement in routine clinical practice (Horovitz-Lennon, et al., 2009).
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