CH302Exam2Rev_Sutcliffe

Colligative properties these all come from the effect

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VP for a solvent with a nonvolatile solute or for two volatile solvents. Colligative properties: (these all come from the effect of VP lowering, so we can think of that as being a colligative property in itself) know and be able to calculate: BP elevation, FP lowering, osmotic pressure. Be able to determine i for an ionic compound and use it to modify your predictions of the effects on these colligative properties. Chapter 6: Know what equlibrium MEANS. What has happened? Is still happening? Be able to write K p or K c expressions for any equation. WATCH the stoichiometric coefficients and state symbols? Remember that ALL concentrations must be in moles/L and all partial pressures must be in atm in order for the K's to come out unitless, as we use 'activity'. What does this mean for liquids and solids? Continuing your understanding from exam 1, know what it means if K is large or small. Know what happens to K if you reverse the reaction or multiply all the coefficients by some factor. Calculations: Be able to do all types covered in class; set up ICE tables if needed. Again, WATCH the stoichiometric coefficients and state symbols. Le Chatalier's Principle: be able to predict which way the reaction will shift given an applied stress, set up an ICE table if needed. Remember, calculate Q and compare it to K ( you might have to calculate that too so read the Q carefully) to tell you which way the reaction will shift, if its not obvious. Chapter 7: Know the Arrhenius definitions of acid and base, and the Bronstead Lowry definitions of acid and base. Be able to recognize conjugate acids and bases. Strength of Acids: know the names and formuale of the five given in your book and notes. Know how K a relates to strength, and what 'strong' means. Know how that then links to the strength of the corresponding conjugate bases. Know how to calculate pH and how to get [H+] from pH. Know how to do this for STRONG acids.
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  • Fall '07
  • Holcombe
  • Solubility, Solvent, stoichiometric coefficients, GENERAL earlier concepts

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