This shows the power of the vow lancelot made in this

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always see Arthur as his king and as a great leader. This shows the power of the vow Lancelot made. In this section, Tennyson uses a lot of caesuras. This happens once or twice in every paragraph. The pauses make the reader slow down at certain sections. These pauses happen a lot when someone is speaking. This helps the reader to really understand who the speaker is saying what they are saying. I really like the use of caesuras. It helps the reader to comprehend what is going on. It also makes the passage more fluent which also helps the reader to understand the passage. Another verbal feature is the repetition of the word eyes. Most of the time Tennyson is referring to Elaine’s eyes. He does this to show her character and to show her admiration for Lancelot. Jewels and diamonds are also repeated throughout this passage. I feel as if Tennyson is using the images of jewels and diamonds to show Elaine’s eyes. Another verbal feature used is the imagery for Elaine’s admiration of Lancelot. Tennyson describes how Elaine sees Lancelot as the goodliest and the noblest of all men. He also describes Lancelot with great detail. Tennyson says that Lancelot is “marr’d with twice her years, seam’d with an ancient sword-cut on the cheek.” This detail really allows the reader to comprehend what Lancelot looks like. Tennyson also uses alliteration throughout this passage. The line that sticks out is when he says “she lifted her eyes / And loved him, with that love which was her doom.” The
Blaesing 3 alliteration in this section is the use of the letter “L”. I liked this line because the alliteration makes this section stick in your mind.
Blaesing 4 He spoke and ceased; the lily maid Elaine, Won by the mellow voice before she look’d, Lifted her eyes and read his lineaments. The great guilty love he bare the Queen, In battle with the love he bare his lord, Had marr’d his face, and mark’d it ere his time. Another sinning on such heights with one, The flower of all the west and all the world, Had been sleeker for it; but in him His mood was often like a fiend, and rose And drove him into wastes and solitudes For agony, who was yet a living soul.

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