The clinician started with individual counseling

This preview shows page 30 - 32 out of 33 pages.

level. The clinician started with individual counseling, assisted her with planning and implementing a safety plan at the mezzo level, and evaluated the results of this strategy. The social worker followed all the steps in the planned change process of the GIM (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2015). There is an inherent power relationship between the social worker and client
and when the social worker decides what a client needs to feel empowered it seems as if the social worker has more power over the life of the client; which should not be the case. I will give an example of working with disabled clients, what a nondisabled social worker may deem to be appropriate intervention to empower the disabled client may not be what they deem to be empowering. If you have never been disabled yourself you can never claim to know what a disabled person needs to feel empowered. That is one example. So empowerment is a very tricky notion and one needs to tread carefully. What makes the practitioner able to determine what it is an individual need to feel empowered? It is very subjective. With diverse, misunderstood and/or oppressed populations, use both ethnic- sensitive (including a specific focus on First Nations people) and socially- sensitive (including a specific focus on persons with developmental disabilities, persons with mental health issues, and aging people) generalist practice approaches;Demonstrate how ecological and empowerment frameworks, as well as other theoretical frameworks, can be employed to inform practice decisions across system levels;Appraise the structure of organizations, service delivery systems, and communities and, under supervision, advocate for organizational and community change based on the principles of social and economic justice;Integrate knowledge of the history of the social work profession and current social welfare structures, fiscal imperatives, policies, and issues with the ability to analyze their impacts upon client systems, human service agencies and systems, and social work practitioners;Apply critical thinking skills in problem-solving with social work values and ethics, human diversity issues, the dynamics of discrimination and oppression, social and economic justice, and interactions among systems;Distinguish their personal values in relation to professional social work ethics, especially the values of self-determination, empowerment, and regard for diversity;Understand and apply the values base and ethics of the profession to practice situations across systems levels; Evaluate the level of intervention. References Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H., Jr. (2014). Understanding generalist practice (7th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. Plummer, S.-B., Makris, S., & Brocksen S. M. (Eds.). (2014). Social work case studies: Foundation year. Baltimore, MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture