The missile crisis the first gulf war in 1990 iraq

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the Missile crisis:The first Gulf war: in 1990, iraq invaded and annexed kuwait, an oil rish sheikdom on thePersian gulf. Fearing that Iraqi dictator saddam Hussein might next attack suadi arabia, alongtime ally that supplied more oil to the united states than any other country, bush rushedtroops to defend the kingdom and warned Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait or face war. In February1991, the US launched operation desert storm which quickly drove the Iraqi army from Kuwait.The united nations ordered Iraq to disarm and imposed economic sanctions that producedwidespread civilian suffering for the rest of the decade. But Hussein remained in place. So did alarge American military establishment in Saudi arabia, to the outrage of Islamic fundamentalists
who deemed its presence an affront to their faith. In the wars immediate aftermath, Bush’s publicapproval rating rode to an unprecedented 89 percent.Vietnamization: Nixon announced a new policy on taking office. Under this plan, Americantroops would gradually be withdrawn while the south Vietnamese soldiers, backed by continuedAmerican bombing, did more and more of the fighting. But this neither limited the war nor endedthe antiwar movement.Détente:Suez Canal crisis: On October 29, 1956, Israeli armed forces pushed into Egypt toward the SuezCanal after Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918-70) nationalized the canal in July ofthat same year, initiating the Suez Crisis. The Israelis soon were joined by French and Britishforces, which nearly brought the Soviet Union into the conflict, and damaged their relationshipswith the United States. In the end, the British, French and Israeli governments withdrew theirtroops in late 1956 and early 1957.The Israelis struck first, on October 26, 1956. Two days later,British and French military forces joined them. Originally, forces from the three countries wereset to strike at once, but the British and French troops were delayed. Behind schedule, butultimately successful, the British and French troops took control of the area around the SuezCanal. However, their hesitation had given the Soviet Union–also confronted with a growingcrisis in Hungary–time to respond. The Soviets, eager to exploit Arab nationalism and gain afoothold in the Middle East, supplied arms from Czechoslovakia to the Egyptian governmentbeginning in 1955, and eventually helped Egypt construct the Aswan Dam on the Nile River afterthe United States refused to support the project. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev (1894-1971)railed against the invasion and threatened to rain down nuclear missiles on Western Europe if theIsraeli-French-British force did not withdraw. The response of President Dwight Eisenhower’sadministration was measured. It warned the Soviets that reckless talk of nuclear conflict wouldonly make matters worse, and cautioned Khrushchev to refrain from direct intervention in theconflict. However, Eisenhower also issued stern warnings to the French, British and Israelis to

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Cold War, Richard Nixon, President of the United States

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