Computer assisted personal interviewing a method in

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Basic Marketing Research
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 3
Basic Marketing Research
Brown/Churchill
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Computer-assisted personal interviewing A method in which the researcher reads questions to the respondent off a computer screen, and keys the respondent’s answers directly into the computer. Computer-assisted self-interviewing A member of the research team intercepts and directs willing respondents to nearby computers. Each respondent reads questions and keys his or her answers directly into a computer. Computer-assisted telephone interviewing Interviewers telephone potential respondents, ask questions of respondents from a computer screen, and key answers directly into a computer. Fully automated telephone interviewing An automated voice asks questions over the telephone, and respondents use their touch-tone telephones to enter their replies. Electronic mail survey Researchers send e-mail or web-based surveys to potential respondents who use electronic mail. Respondents key in their answers and send an e-mail reply or submit the complete web survey. Source: Adapted from V. Kumar, David A. Aaker, George S. Day, Essentials of Marketing Research (New York: John Wiley and Sons), 1999, p. 258. Tashatuvango/Shutterstock.com
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Basic Marketing Research
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 3
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Chapter 7 Primary Data Collection 139 be downloaded to the respondent’s computer for completion and then either mailed or electronically sent to the researcher. Of course differences in monitor screen size, com- puter clock speed, use of full or partial screen for viewing questionnaire, use of broadband versus telephone transmission lines, and other variables will result in different presenta- tions of the questionnaire for different viewers. Also, computer navigation skills still vary widely across the population and must be taken into account when designing a Web-based survey. Designing Internet surveys adds another set of challenges to the researcher us- ing questionnaires to collect data, and those researchers interested in using this medium should consult one of the recent publications addressing this topic (see, for example, Don Dillman, Mail and Internet Surveys , New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2000, pp. 361–401). Some of the movement toward the use of the Internet for survey research is due to the increasing number of people with access to and amount of time devoted to being on the Web. Set-up time can be as fast or faster than CATI, with faster survey execution (often the targeted number of completed surveys can be reached in a few days). Also, the ability of the respondent to choose the time for completing the survey gives it an advantage over personal or telephone interviewing. Not everything about the use of the Internet for survey research is positive, however. At present one of the issues of greatest concern is the degree to which respondents to Internet surveys are representative of a target population. If the survey is meant to be projectable to a population with a high percentage of access to and usage of the Internet (such as university faculty, businesses, groups of professionals, purchasers of computer equipment), then this issue is of less concern. But when the survey is meant to be pro-

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