The Negotiation Checklist - Simons and Tripp.pdf

Some negotiators use either of two common gambits one

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Some negotiators use either of two common gambits. One is to return from a break with a request for just one more concession that can seal the deal. This tactic, known as “taking a second bite of the apple,” is common among car deal- ers. The appropriate response is to suggest that if the other party would like to reopen negotiations, you are willing to reopen them, too—but on all the issues, not just one. “Good cop, bad cop” is a tactic whereby the person with whom you negotiate plays the role of “wanting” to meet all your needs, but “de- mands” are being made by someone who is higher up and usually absent from the actual negotiation (e.g., the sales manager). One response to this approach is to take a break to reas- sess the other side’s stance compared to your tripwire. Another is to insist on speaking directly with the final decision-maker. 4. What are the limits to the other party’s authority? Establish early the level of authority held by your counterpart. Most negotiators, unless they are the CEOs of their companies, are authorized to negoti- ate only certain specified issues and within certain ranges. Determine whether you are negotiating with the right person, or whether far more latitude in generating resolu- tions might be available if you nego- tiated with someone else. 5. Consult in advance with the other party about the agenda. As we stated earlier, con- sider calling the other party before- hand to share what issues you plan to discuss and to ask what issues the other party might raise. In general, holding back information is counter-productive and introducing unexpected issues generally delays the proceedings. Although good negotiators often get creative in their approach to the issues, this creativity must be well- grounded in an understanding of the issues and of both parties’ priorities. A well-prepared negotiator has con- sidered these factors in depth, and has also considered the past and future context of the business rela- tionship between the parties. It has been said that no plan survives con- tact with the enemy—but it remains true that the shrewd general will have memorized the terrain and analyzed the strengths and weak- nesses of both sides before an en- gagement. Fortune favors the pre- pared mind. CQ
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